Krill trawler transhipping to a reefer

The new 'Fisheries' stamp issue was released on 01 May 2008. The issue is the first in a series entitled “The Waters of South Georgia” and comprises four stamps and a First Day Cover.

The waters around South Georgia teem with marine life, thanks to the rich mixing of cold and warm currents at the polar front. Krill, the basic building block of the Southern Ocean’s biology, gathers in large swarms and is fed upon by larger fish, penguins and marine mammals. The deep waters around the Island are home to strange species, which only in the last few decades have become a target for fishermen.

Conserving the rich diversity and abundant fish stocks is the first objective of the Government of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands. Protecting the seas is expensive, with Patrol Vessel costs running over £2m per annum, and research costs nearing £1m. To fund this work, the Government allows carefully controlled and responsible fishing vessels to operate annually under licence. The fees from the sale of these licences provide the majority of the territory’s revenue.

Quotas for fishing are set annually by the international body the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and take into account the size of the stock and also any other species of wildlife which depend on the fish for food to make sure that the ecosystem is not unbalanced by commercial fishing.
Source: South Georgia & and South Sandwich Islands post

The four ships have been identified as.
50p ARGOS FROYANES.
60p ROBERT M LEE.
85p The krill trawler and reefer both not identified at anchor in Cumberland Bay, South Georgia.
£1.05 Research vessel PHAROS SG

RANGER J5 yacht 1937

Built as a steel hulled J-class yacht by the Bath Iron Works, Bath for Harold S. Vanderbilt, built as a defender of the 1937 America Cup.
Designed by William Starling Burgess & Olin J. Stephens.
11 May 1937 launched as the RANGER J5. Christened by Mrs. Vanderbilt.
Displacement 166 tons, dim. 41.20 x 6.40 x 4.57m. (draught), length on waterline 26.52m.
Sail area 701.05m².

In the Preliminary Tests she won almost every race against other USA yachts and she was chosen to defend the America Cup Races at Rhode Island in 1937.
She won under skipper Harold S. Vanderbilt all four races from 31 July till 5 August against the British yacht ENDEAVOUR II and the America Cup stayed in the USA.
The rest of the summer of 1937 was she used for races and was very successful.
21 May 1941 the RANGER was sold for scrap for US$ 12,000 to the L & Z Corporation of Fall River, Mass.

Grenadines of Grenada 1992 75c sg1581, scott1478.
Solomon Islands 18c sg570a, scott
http://america-scoop.com/index.php?opti ... 18&lang=en

ENDEAVOUR (II) yacht 1936

Built as a steel hulled J-class yacht by Camper & Nicholson, Gosport, Hampshire for Thomas Octave Murdoch Sopwith a member of the Royal Yacht Squadron, as a challenger for the 1937 America Cup.
Designer: Charles E. Nicholson.
February 1936 laid down.
08 June 1936 launched as the ENDEAVOUR (II) K6.
Displacement 162.6 ton, dim. 41.39 x 6.55 x 4.08m. (draught aft), length on waterline 26.36m.
Sail area 700.77m².

In 1937 she crossed the North Atlantic and arrived in Newport, Rhode Island in the end of May.
She was in 1937 the challenger of the America Cup against the USA yacht RANGER off Newport, Rhode Island.
31 July 1937 the first race the ENDEAVOUR (II) under skipper T.O.M.Sopwith is beaten by the RANGER, and also the second, third and fourth race.
After the America Cup she sailed back to the U.K. under captain George Williams who died during the passage on an ulcer.
In 1938 was she laid up at the builder’s yard in Gosport.
1947 Sold to Charles Kerridge Ltd. for scrap.
1968 At least her hulk was scrapped in Southampton, U.K.

Grenada & Grenadines 1992 75c sg 1581, scott1478. (She is the black hulled yacht in the background of the stamp.)
http://america-scoop.com/index.php?opti ... 14&lang=en

ATALANTA yacht 1881

ATALANTA built as a wooden hulled centreboard sloop at the Flint & Holton lumber yard, Belleville, Ontario, Canada by and for Captain Alexander Cuthbert, as a challenger for the America Cup. Cuthbert was a member of the Bay of Quinte Yacht Club, Canada,
Designed also by Captain Cuthbert.
Early spring 1881 keel laid down.
17 September 1881 launched as the ATALANTA, named after a daughter of a mythical Greek King, she had promised to marry any man who could sprint faster than herself but to put to dead all those who tried and failed.
Gross register tons 46.65, displacement 44.7 tons, dim. 21.34 x 5.79 x 5.03m. (draught), length on waterline 19.50m.
Sail area 289.67m².

She was late in the season almost completed and to be at time in New York she was forced to pass via the inland route to New York, entering the Erie Canal at Oswego.
30 October 1881 arrived at New York harbour.
The first race under skipper Alexander Cuthbert against the defender the MISCHIEF on 08 November was cancelled due to light winds and fog.
09 November the first race over a distance of 32.6 mile off New York was won by the MISCHIEF and also the second race on 10 November was won by the MISCHIEF and the cup stayed in the hands of the New York Yacht Club.
1882 The ATALANTA sailed on Lake Ontario.
1883 Took part in the Fisher Cup at Chicago, she was leading but broke her spinnaker boom and lost against the yacht CORA, at that time the ATALANTA was owned by the Gifford Syndicate of Cobury, Canada.
After repairs were made she raced again in a private match on the same course, and in this race she beat the CORA by 16 minutes.
The ATALANTA kept the Fisher Cup until 1886.
1896 She got on fire and was partly burned. Sold and taken to Chicago for repairs, she was rebuilt with higher topsides and flush deck.
1900 Was she seen in New Orleans, where after she disappears, fate unknown.
More info is given on:
http://america-scoop.com/index.php?opti ... 57&lang=en

Grenadines of Grenada 1992 15c sg1578, scott1475. (she is the yacht in the background of the stamp.)

Source The Story of the America Cup 1851-2003 by Ranulf Rayner. http://navalmarinearchive.com/research/atalanta.html

SHAMROCK IV yacht

SHAMROCK IV built as a yacht by Camper & Nicholson, Gosport, Hampshire for Sir Thomas Lipton a member of the Royal Ulster Yacht Club.
Designed by Charles Ernest Nicholson.
26 May 1914 launched.
Displacement 108.3 ton. Dim. 33.63 x 6.35 x 4.16m. (draught), length on waterline 22.86m.
Sail area 971.70 m².
Was the challenger under skipper William Burton for the 1920 America Cup against the USA yacht RESOLUTE.
1932 Broken up. Much more info is given on:
http://america-scoop.com/index.php?opti ... 72&lang=en

Grenada Grenadines 1987 35c sg1580, scott1477 (She is the green hulled yacht in the foreground.)
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shamrock_IV

THAMES POLICE LAUNCH No 1

The POLICE patrol launch is depict on the 15p stamp of the U.K. Police series of September 1979 for the 150th Anniversary of the Metropolitan Police in London.
The launch shown on the stamp is the proto-type of seven patrol launches and the was built by the Tyler Boat Company at Hull in 1976. Designer Keith Nelson. On the bow is No 1
Tonnage 7 ton. Dimensions 35’ x 8’6”x 3’6” with a draught of 2’9”.
Powered by two Ford Sabre diesel engines each 287 hp. twin shafts, speed 27 knots.
Crew 3.
Fitted out with a first aid kit, loudhailer, echo sounder, search light, VHF and radio to be in contact with Scotland Yard.
The launch was fitted out by Porter L. Hayletts.
The hull of the launch is made of fibreglass reinforced plastic (Plymouth 34 GRP).

After the London police got experience with the prototype, another six launches were ordered by Tough Brothers Ltd. at Isleworth (on the Thames). These type had a larger wheelhouse to carry a few more men.
2014 Most probably the launches have been all replaced by newer types, but I can’t find a fate of the launches.

Great Britain 1979 15p sg1103, scott878.
Source: Log Book.

RESOLUTE yacht 1914

Built as a mono-hull yacht by Herreshoff Manufacturing Company at Bristol, Rhode Island for a syndicate of New York Yacht Club members headed by Henry Walters to content the 1914 America’s Cup.
Designed by Nathanael Greene Herreshoff.
25 April 1914 launched as the RESOLUTE and christened by Grace Vanderbilt.
Displacement 95.7 ton. Dim. 32.43 x 6.43 x 4.23m (draught), length on waterline 22.58 m.
Sail area 815.22 m².
She was the last Cup defender to be designed by Herreshoff.
Under skipper Charles Francis Adams III she took part in the America Cup challenge race off Sandy Hook, she beat VANITIE and DEFIANCE, she was sailing the race distance of 30 miles in 3 hour 16 minutes and 41 seconds.
August 1914 when war was declared between the UK and Germany the America Cup race was postponed and also the challenge races.
1920 The America Cup was reconvened and RESOLUTE again prevailed in the selection races before successfully under skipper Charles Francis Adams III defending the America Cup 1920.
RESOLUTE lost the first two races before she won the next three races against the SHAMROCK IV under skipper William Burton.
Her racing career lasted another ten years, and in 1930 RESOLUTE again participated in the America's cup selection races, albeit as a "trial horse" against which the potential defenders could be judged.
In 1925 RESOLUTE was sold to E. Walter Clark of Philadelphia.
1931 Converted to the J-class.
1939 Scrapped.
Robert F Kennedy named his Wianno Senior Resolute in 1964, after the America's Cup yacht.
More on the yacht is given on: http://america-scoop.com/index.php?opti ... 99&lang=en

Grenada 1987 60c sg 1612, scott1492.
Grenadines of Grenada 1987 60c sg1580, scott1477. (The SHAMROCK IV is the yacht in the foreground with the green hull.)
Nevis 1989 80c sg724, scott766.
Solomon Islands 1986 18c sg570a, scott?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resolute_(yacht) Internet. History of the America Cup 1851-2003 by Ranulf Rayner.
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IMO / GUVERNOREN and MONT BLANC

The full index of our ship stamp archive

IMO / GUVERNOREN and MONT BLANC

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Nov 24, 2009 8:12 pm

tmp20C.jpg
Click image to view full size
Built as cargo and livestock carrier by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the White Star Lines.
01 January 1889 launched under the name RUNIC.
Tonnage 4.639 gross, 3.122 net, dim. 131.27 x 13.77 x 9.14m.
Powered by one 3-cyl triple expansion steamengine, manufactured by the ships builder, 424 nhp., speed 13 knots.
1889 Completed.

21 February 1889 sailed for her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York. She and her sister the CUFIC were the first livestock carriers of the White Star Lines.
Carried general cargo outward and returned home with around 1000 life cattle.

1895 Sold to the West India & Pacific SS Co., renamed TAMPICAN.
31 December 1899 transferred to F. Leyland & Co., not renamed.
The same year reboilered, still in the service from Liverpool to New York.
1912 Sold to H.E.Moss & Co., Liverpool, not renamed.
Immediately sold to South Pacific Whaling Co., Christiania (now Oslo), renamed in IMO.
Converted in a whale oil tanker for Antarctic whaling service.

During the First World War was she chartered by the Belgian Relief Commission.
06 December 1917 when she was in ballast steaming across Halifax Bay, Nova Scotia, Canada outward bound with destination New York came she in collision with the French ship MONT BLANC around 08.45 a.m., which was loaded with ammunition and inward bound.
The IMO struck the MONT BLANC abreast of the forward hold, causing some barrels of the 35-ton benzol, carried as deck cargo, to ignite the picric acid in the hold below.
The crew of the MONT BLANC fully aware of the dangers of the cargo on board abandoned the vessel, leaving the blazing MONT BLANC drifting in the stream. The fire attracted many spectators to the waterfront, and she drifted into Halifax’s Pier 6.
Some vessels tried to put a towline on board the burning vessel, and to tow her away from the pier, but at
09.00 the MONT BLANC erupted causing the greatest man made explosion before the Atomic bomb. The blast was felt 120 miles away.
Most part of the densely populated suburb of Richmond was flattened, and within a 16-mile radius 1.630 buildings were destroyed. Only two vessels were lost the MONT BLANC and a wooden schooner the LOLAR, all other damaged vessels in port were later repaired.
Officially 1.963 people were killed, with 9.000 injured and 199 blinded by flying glass, although the casualties aboard the ships in the harbour bring the death toll closer to 3.000.
The captain and the pilot and 5 of de crew of 41 on board the IMO were killed during the explosion, she was hurled across the stream, with most of her upper structure ripped away, and grounded.
After four months the IMO was refloated and towed to New York for repair.
1918 She was rebuilt in a whale factory ship, renamed in GUVERNOREN.

30 November 1921 during heavy fog she ran aground on the rocks at Cow Bay, two miles off Cape Carysfort on East Flakland, all crew were saved.
Salvage attempts were made but the GUVERNOREN was not refloated, and salvage work was halted on 03 December 1921, and she was abandoned to the sea.
Today the wreckage is still there from the waterline up, and lying on her starboard side.


The other ship on fire as seen on the stamp must be the MONT BLANC. The design is wrong, the fire started in the forward hold, and not as seen on the stamp on the afterpart of the vessel.

Built as a cargo vessel under yard No 460 by Sir Raylton Dixon & Co., Ltd. Middelsbrough, U.K. for the Soc. Générale de Transport Maritimes á Vapeur, Marseille.
Launched under the name MONT BLANC.
Tonnage 3.279 gross, 2.251 net, dim. 320 x 44.8 x 15.3ft.
Powered by a triple expansion steam engine 247 nhp. Speed 9.5 knots, one propeller.
June 1899 delivered to owners.

1906 Sold to E. Anquetil, Rouen, France.
1915 Sold to G Petit, Rouen.
1916 Sold to Cie Générale Transatlantique, St Nazaire.

06 December 1917 on a voyage from New York to Halifax under command of Captain Aime Le Medec loaded with a cargo of around 5.000 ton high explosives, she came in collision with the outward bound Norwegian IMO, both ships were under pilot control, and there was plenty of room and it visibility was good.
When both ships approached each other there was a lot of confusion, and a collision happened.
After some barrels of benzol loaded on deck of the MONT BLANC ignited, the crew on board aware of the dangers of the cargo abandoned the vessel and rowed hard for the shore, and just after she landed about 20 minutes later the MONT BLANC did exploded at 09.05 a.m. and she was disintegrated into a mass of wreckage.

Only one men of the crew of the MONT BLANC was lost.

Falkland Islands 2005 £1.20 sg?, scott?


Source: North Atlantic Seaway by Bonsor. Dictionary of Disasters at sea during the age of steam by Hocking. Some web-sites. http://museum.gov.ns.ca/mma/AtoZ/imo.html http://museum.gov.ns.ca/mma/Ato/montblanc.html (A google search gives plenty of sites on this explosion.)
Register of Merchant ships completed in 1899.
aukepalmhof
 
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