SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

Vera Cruz (Ship) 1866

Knight (Cavaliere) Giuseppe Tonello (Captain Gaspare Perissa, 1866-71) Trieste, Austria/Italy; San Marco, near Trieste, Austria; 850 tons; 19’ draught; oak hull sheeted and copper fastened, single deck; four cannons; crew 12.

She was registered on May 12, 1866, as a long distance trader. Giuseppe Tonello died in 1869, and after two years of an inheritance process, his widow, Anna Tonello (née Stamare) became the sole owner of the vessel. (Their daughter Virginia was married into the Fiume branch of the Cosulich family.) The original tonnage of 850 tons was only reduced to 710 tons (corresponding to the Moorsome rule) in 1880, (although the American Register of 1870, indicated only 775 tons).

In Lloyd’s of 1870, her captain is still listed as Perissa, and in 1872, her owners are listed as: Anna Vedovaand Tonello and Antonioas Bilaffer as captain. In 1877, the captain was Diodato G. Bilaffer, and in 1878, her owners were listed as “Giovanni and Maria Ragusin and the late Marco.” Giovanni Ragusin was the captain. The Registry
from 1881 lists her tonnage as 710. She was abandoned on December 1, 1879, near (Cap) Finistere.

It should also be noted, that there was a brig of 406 tons named Vera-Cruz, that was lost in 1864, in a storm near Cape St. Vincent.

Yugoslavia 1998 , 2.00d S.G.?, Scott: 2421 .

Source: Watercraft Philately (Article by Auke Palmhof)

Akizuki IJN (Type B Class Destroyer) 1942

Akizuki was the lead ship of her class of destroyer in the Imperial Japanese Navy. Her name means “Autumn Moon.” Built in Maizuru Naval Arsenal. Laid down in 30 July 1940. Launched in 2 July 1941. Completed in 11 June 1942. Commissioned in 11 June 1942, Yokosuka Chinjufu.

Displacement: 2,700 tons standard; 3,700 tons full load; 440'3" x 38'1" x 13'7" (draught); Machinery: 2-shaft geared turbines: 52,000 SHP; 33 knots; 8,300 miles at 18 knots; Armament: 8 x 3.9"/65 cal. DP guns (4 x 2); 4 x 25 mm. AA guns (2 x 2); 4 x 24" TT (1 x 4); 6 depth charge throwers; 72 depth charges; Complement: 263.

In October 1944 Akizuki was part of the Northern Force commanded by Vice Admiral Ozawa Jisaburo, in the Japanese attack on the Allied forces supporting the invasion of Leyte. On 25 October, in the Battle off Cape Engaño, it was sunk, probably by torpedo, ENE of Cape Engaño, during the initial U.S. air attack on the Northern Force. Most sources credit the hit to aircraft of Task Force 38, but some give credit to submarine USS Halibut (SS-232).


The largest, most handsome and, in the Japanese estimation, most successful destroyers in the Imperial fleet were those of the Akizuki class. Known as the "Type B," these ships were designed primarily as antiaircraft escorts for the carrier force.

As originally conceived, they would not even have carried torpedoes, but a later desire to add an offensive capability saw the inclusion in the design of a quadruple 24" torpedo mount amidships. The main features distinguishing this class from other Japanese destroyers were their size and innovative armament. Some 50 feet longer and 700 tons heavier than the preceding Kagero’s and Yugumo’s, the Akizuki’s were able to carry a fourth main-battery turret without suffering any topweight problems as a result. These turrets were large, fully-enclosed and power-operated, and each mounted twin 3.9" high-velocity guns. Though designed as AA weapons, their high rate of fire and range of 20,000 yards made them at least the equal of their American 5-inch counterparts. From 1943 on, each destroyer was also equipped with 15 to 51- 25 mm. machine guns, the number increasing as the war progressed, and a full array of Types 21 and 22 radars.

The ships of the Akizuki class were built concurrently with those of the Yugumo class, with the first six ordered under the 1939 program and another 10, known as the Shimotsuki group, under the 1941 program. Of the latter, four were never built, Michizuki being broken up on the stocks in March 1945 to make way for suicide craft, while Hazuki, Kiyotsuki and Ozuki were all cancelled. A large number of succeeding vessels, hull numbers 777-785 of the 1942 program and 5061-5083 of the modified 1942 program, proved nothing more than expressions of wishful thinking.

Twelve Akizukis were actually built, most of them serving in the 41st and 61st Destroyer Divisions. Six survived the war, but four of those, Yoizuki, Haruzuki, Hanazuki and Natsuzuki, were completed too late to see action outside of Japanese home waters. Though favorite targets of U.S. submarines, only one ship of the class was actually sunk by a submarine. Two were lost to air attack and three in surface actions – an interesting breakdown considering their original design as antiaircraft escorts.

Their swept-back lines and large single funnel made the Akizukis very similar in appearance to light cruiser Yubari, and in fact U.S. forces would consistently misidentify these ships as cruisers. And that appreciation was not so wide of the mark, considering their frequent employment in place of cruisers as squadron flagships. Their bridges were actually a bit too cramped for the addition of an admiral and his staff, and their turn of speed inferior to that of most of their contemporaries. But the Akizukis continued as favorites in the role of destroyer leader, and three were lost while so employed.

All in all, the Akizuki class represented an excellent, versatile design, and the vessels turned in solid performances. Lead-ship, Akizuki herself, compiled the most impressive record, fighting from Guadalcanal to Leyte Gulf with but one significant break in service due to damage. And Teruzuki surely dealt her enemies some terrible blows one bloody night in Ironbottom Sound. But the most notable action of any of the class was

Hatsuzuki's last fight off Cape Engano, an exhibition of such tenacity and selflessness as to rank with that of the American destroyers off Samar.

Grenada Grenadines 1995 $2,00, S.G.?, Scott: 1721Ae.

Source: Watercraft Philately (Article by Myron Molnau).

Source: Wikipedia

Ashigara IJN (Heavy Cruiser) 1929

Ashigara was a Myōkō-class heavy cruiser of the Imperial Japanese Navy. The other sister ships of her class were Myōkō, Nachi, and Haguro. She was named after a mountain on the border of Kanagawa and Shizuoka prefectures, also known as Mount Kintoki.

The ships of this class displaced 13,300 tons, were 204 m (669 ft) long, and were capable of 36 knots. They carried one aircraft and their main armament were ten 8 inch guns. Ashigara was laid down at the Kawasaki shipyard in Kobe on April 11, 1925, launched on April 22, 1928, and was commissioned into the Imperial Navy on August 20, 1929.

In World War II she took part in the Invasion of the Philippines in December 1941. In the Battle of the Java Sea on March 1, 1942 she shared in the sinking of the cruiser HMS Exeter and the destroyer HMS Encounter.

From 1942 to 1944 she was assigned to guard duties and troop transportation and saw no action.

In the Battle of Leyte Gulf on October 24, 1944, Ashigara, with Captain Hayao Miura in command, was assigned to Vice Admiral Kiyohide Shima's force along with Nachi and eight destroyers. This force entered Surigao Straiton October 25 after Admiral Shoji Nishimura's First Raiding Force had been destroyed, following the losses of Fusō and Nishimura's Yamashiro along with their escorts in the hands of Rear Admiral Jesse B. Oldendorf's fleet and aircraft, in which during this action Nishimura was killed aboard the Yamashiro. Ashigara and Nachi fired their torpedoes and retreated (Nachi with damage from a collision with Mogami).

In December 1944 Ashigara took part in an attempted attack on the American landings on Mindoro in the Philippines along with the Ōyodo and the destroyers Kiyoshimo, Asashimo, Kasumi, Kaya, Kashi, and Sugi. On December 26 she came under air attack and was damaged by a 227 kg (500 lb) bomb, but was able to shell the American beachhead on December 27 of the same year.

On June 8, 1945, Ashigara left Batavia for Singapore with 1,600 troops on board, escorted by the destroyer Kamikaze. In the Bangka Strait the two ships came under attack from three Allied submarines, USS Blueback, HMS Trenchant and HMS Stygian. Kamikaze attacked Trenchant with gunfire, forcing her to submerge, and then with depth charges, but Trenchant's C.O., Commander Arthur Hezlet, spotted Ashigara and fired eight torpedoes at her at about 12:15. Ashigara was hit five times at a range of 4,000 yards and capsized at 12:37 Kamikaze rescued 400 troops and 853 crew, including C.O. Miura.

Grenada Grenadines 1995, S.G.?, Scott: 1721Ag.

Tanzania 1995, S.G.?, Scott: 1352g.

Source: Wikipedia

CUMBERLAND privateer 1757

CUMBERLAND (or DUKE OF CUMBERLAND is given in Jersey Sailing Ships) I did find both names for the ship which was used as a privateer under command of Captain Philip Seward in 1757.
The Jersey Post gives by this stamp:
In 1757 the CUMBERLAND under Captain Seward chased a large French ship across the Bay of Biscay. The French captain however, decided not to engage in a fight and the entire crew of 30 men lowered the ship’s boats and rowed away. Seward ordered his crew to row across to the abandoned vessel but a storm blew up and they were never seen again leaving Seward with insufficient crew to continue his privateering pursuits.
The CUMBERLAND was owned by D. Messervy in Jersey and of 70 tons and used as a privateer from 1757-58 under command of Captain Seward. She lost one man in action Jean Arthur.
She was armed with 10 carriage guns and 10 swivel guns.
From the net I got that on 10 June 1759 the DUKE OF CUMBERLAND under command of John Ellsworthy imported 348 slaves in Barbados, if she is the same vessel I can’t find, the name CUMBERLAND and DUKE OF CUMBERLAND are very common in the ship registers.
Fate unknown.
(I believe the ship in the background is the French ship, she looks a little too large for a 70 ton vessel and the boat in the foreground is the shipsboat from the CUMBERLAND rowing to the French abandoned ship.)

Jersey 2014 69p sg?, scott?
Source: Jersey Sailing Ships by John Jean. Jersey Post.

SANTANDER SAILING WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS 2014

A stamp in the Sports series is being issued, dedicated to the Santander ISAF Sailing World Championships 2014.
The Sailing World Championships is the most important event organized by the International Sailing Federation. It takes place every four years, two before the Olympic Games, and is used to allot 75% of the places for countries taking part in the Games.
Santander is hosting the 4th World Sailing Championships over the first two weeks of September, when it will welcome about 1000 yachts and 1400 crew from more than 95 countries. The eleven Olympic categories will take part in the competition. Countries which qualify can participate in the Rio de Janeiro Olympic Games in 2016.
The Royal Spanish Sailing Federation (RFEV) has set up several sites in the capital city of Cantabria, such as the marshland of the Santander Real Club Marítimo to moor the organization’s and keeled boats, the Star and the Elliots of the Women's Match Race, and the CEAR Príncipe Felipe (Specialist Centre for High Performance in Sailing), as well as other port areas nearby.
The first World Sailing Championships were held in Spain in 2003 in the Bay of Cadiz. Spanish philately marked this competition by issuing a commemorative stamp.
The second Championships were held in Cascais in Portugal in 2007, where 1350 sailors from 76 countries attended.
The third took place in Perth in Australia in 2011, with 1200 sailors from 79 countries.
Spain currently holds fourth place in the medals table in the World Sailing Championships, following the 2011 event, with three gold’s, one silver and two bronze.
The stamp recreates the blue waves of Cantabria, around yachts with sails billowing in the wind in front of the Magdalena Palace, an iconic building in Santander.
Spain 2014 Euro

Source: Spanish Post.

HAUNTED CANADA sailing vessel

Friday the 13th June 2014 Canada Post has issued five stamps that are sure to get the hairs raising on the back of your neck. The collection is the first in a multi-year series telling some of Canada’s most inexplicable and popular ghostly tales.
In every region across Canada, there are reports of apparitions, eerie sounds, phantom lights and spirits trapped between this world and the next.

Only one of this stamps which shows us a burning sailing vessel is interesting for the ship on stamp collectors.

The Northumberland Strait: The tale has been told by residents for at least 200 years of a vision of a burning ship on the waters between New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. On several occasions, onlookers have tried to rescue the ship but as soon as rescuers come close, the ship disappears into the mist.

Canada 2014 sg?, scott?

Source: Canada Post.
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IMO / GUVERNOREN and MONT BLANC

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IMO / GUVERNOREN and MONT BLANC

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Nov 24, 2009 8:12 pm

tmp20C.jpg
Click image to view full size
Built as cargo and livestock carrier by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the White Star Lines.
01 January 1889 launched under the name RUNIC.
Tonnage 4.639 gross, 3.122 net, dim. 131.27 x 13.77 x 9.14m.
Powered by one 3-cyl triple expansion steamengine, manufactured by the ships builder, 424 nhp., speed 13 knots.
1889 Completed.

21 February 1889 sailed for her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York. She and her sister the CUFIC were the first livestock carriers of the White Star Lines.
Carried general cargo outward and returned home with around 1000 life cattle.

1895 Sold to the West India & Pacific SS Co., renamed TAMPICAN.
31 December 1899 transferred to F. Leyland & Co., not renamed.
The same year reboilered, still in the service from Liverpool to New York.
1912 Sold to H.E.Moss & Co., Liverpool, not renamed.
Immediately sold to South Pacific Whaling Co., Christiania (now Oslo), renamed in IMO.
Converted in a whale oil tanker for Antarctic whaling service.

During the First World War was she chartered by the Belgian Relief Commission.
06 December 1917 when she was in ballast steaming across Halifax Bay, Nova Scotia, Canada outward bound with destination New York came she in collision with the French ship MONT BLANC around 08.45 a.m., which was loaded with ammunition and inward bound.
The IMO struck the MONT BLANC abreast of the forward hold, causing some barrels of the 35-ton benzol, carried as deck cargo, to ignite the picric acid in the hold below.
The crew of the MONT BLANC fully aware of the dangers of the cargo on board abandoned the vessel, leaving the blazing MONT BLANC drifting in the stream. The fire attracted many spectators to the waterfront, and she drifted into Halifax’s Pier 6.
Some vessels tried to put a towline on board the burning vessel, and to tow her away from the pier, but at
09.00 the MONT BLANC erupted causing the greatest man made explosion before the Atomic bomb. The blast was felt 120 miles away.
Most part of the densely populated suburb of Richmond was flattened, and within a 16-mile radius 1.630 buildings were destroyed. Only two vessels were lost the MONT BLANC and a wooden schooner the LOLAR, all other damaged vessels in port were later repaired.
Officially 1.963 people were killed, with 9.000 injured and 199 blinded by flying glass, although the casualties aboard the ships in the harbour bring the death toll closer to 3.000.
The captain and the pilot and 5 of de crew of 41 on board the IMO were killed during the explosion, she was hurled across the stream, with most of her upper structure ripped away, and grounded.
After four months the IMO was refloated and towed to New York for repair.
1918 She was rebuilt in a whale factory ship, renamed in GUVERNOREN.

30 November 1921 during heavy fog she ran aground on the rocks at Cow Bay, two miles off Cape Carysfort on East Flakland, all crew were saved.
Salvage attempts were made but the GUVERNOREN was not refloated, and salvage work was halted on 03 December 1921, and she was abandoned to the sea.
Today the wreckage is still there from the waterline up, and lying on her starboard side.


The other ship on fire as seen on the stamp must be the MONT BLANC. The design is wrong, the fire started in the forward hold, and not as seen on the stamp on the afterpart of the vessel.

Built as a cargo vessel under yard No 460 by Sir Raylton Dixon & Co., Ltd. Middelsbrough, U.K. for the Soc. Générale de Transport Maritimes á Vapeur, Marseille.
Launched under the name MONT BLANC.
Tonnage 3.279 gross, 2.251 net, dim. 320 x 44.8 x 15.3ft.
Powered by a triple expansion steam engine 247 nhp. Speed 9.5 knots, one propeller.
June 1899 delivered to owners.

1906 Sold to E. Anquetil, Rouen, France.
1915 Sold to G Petit, Rouen.
1916 Sold to Cie Générale Transatlantique, St Nazaire.

06 December 1917 on a voyage from New York to Halifax under command of Captain Aime Le Medec loaded with a cargo of around 5.000 ton high explosives, she came in collision with the outward bound Norwegian IMO, both ships were under pilot control, and there was plenty of room and it visibility was good.
When both ships approached each other there was a lot of confusion, and a collision happened.
After some barrels of benzol loaded on deck of the MONT BLANC ignited, the crew on board aware of the dangers of the cargo abandoned the vessel and rowed hard for the shore, and just after she landed about 20 minutes later the MONT BLANC did exploded at 09.05 a.m. and she was disintegrated into a mass of wreckage.

Only one men of the crew of the MONT BLANC was lost.

Falkland Islands 2005 £1.20 sg?, scott?


Source: North Atlantic Seaway by Bonsor. Dictionary of Disasters at sea during the age of steam by Hocking. Some web-sites. http://museum.gov.ns.ca/mma/AtoZ/imo.html http://museum.gov.ns.ca/mma/Ato/montblanc.html (A google search gives plenty of sites on this explosion.)
Register of Merchant ships completed in 1899.
aukepalmhof
 
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