SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
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A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

AL MANSUR (B2) patrol craft

Built as a fast patrol craft under yard No 387 by Brooke Marine, Lowestoft, U.K. for the Oman Navy.
Launched as the AL MANSUR (B2) five sisters.
Displacement 135 ton standard, 153 full load, dim. 37.5 x 6.9 x 1.7m. (draught)
Powered by two diesel engines, 4,800 bhp., twin shafts, speed 27 knots.
Armament: Two MM38 Exocet SSM launchers, 2 – 40mm guns, 1 – 76mm gun and 1 – 20mm gun.
Crew 27.
26 March 1973 completed.

1977/78 Modernized by Brooke Marine, Lowestoft.
2015 I can’t find when decommissioned but she is not more in service.

Oman 1980 150b sg 235, scott?
Source: Fast Attack Craft by Bernard Ireland. Internet.

BT GLOBAL CHALLENGE yacht

The 15 fd stamp of Djibouti issued in 2000 shows us a sailing yacht with the inscription “BT Global Challenge”, I could not find a yacht with this name and after finding the web-site http://www.seachallenge.com/index.html which shows the same yacht with the logo on the bow as depict on the stamp, the only photo I could find on the net of the yacht. Not a name is given but she is one of the “Challenge 67 class” of which 14 were built for the BT Global Challenge 1996/7.
One the site is given a volunteer woman crewmember Jan Giffen who got training on the TOSHIBA II ex THOSIBA (1) most probably this yacht is depict. She was built in 1992 and renamed TOSHIBA II in 1996.
The 14 Challenge class yacht have the following details:
All 14 were built by Pendennis Plus (ex Devonport Yachts Ltd.) and designed by David Thomas and Thanos Condylis.
Steel hulled.
Displacement 40 tons, dim. 20.42 x 5.26 x 2.82m. (draught)
Keel weight 12 tons.
Sail area maximum 441 square meter
Fitted out with an auxiliary Perkins diesel, 130 hp.
Accommodation for 14 persons in six cabins.
Wikipedia has the following on this race:
BT Global Challenge 1996/7
An expanded fleet of 14 Challenge 67 yachts set out from Southampton in driving rain and gales. Again rigging problems struck in the Southern Ocean and CONCERT was dismasted. Skipper Chris Tibbs and crew made a jury rig and motorsailed to Wellington, New Zealand. CONCERT was re-rigged in time to start leg 3 from Wellington to Sydney and was 2nd on the Sydney to Cape Town leg. Yacht PAUSE TO REMEMBER, skippered by Tom O'Connor, suffered a snapped boom half way between Sydney and Cape Town. There seemed no choice but to fly their trysail until crewmembers Graham Phelp and Matthew Reeves took on the challenge of trying to repair it by using a cut out section as a splint. Two days later a shortened boom emerged from below decks and was successfully attached to the mast. Three weeks later and having suffered several storms with wind speeds in excess of 50 kn (93 km/h), PAUSE TO REMEMBER sailed into Cape Town, with boom still intact.
This race featured an extra leg to Boston and a crew of disabled men and women took part on TIME & TIDE the first to sail round the world.
Mike Golding dominated, winning five out of six legs in GROUP 4 with Andy Hindley winning the remaining leg in SAVE THE CHILDREN. Three skippers had graduated from being crew volunteers four years earlier: Andy Hindley; Mark Lodge; and Simon Walker, all of whom appeared in the top five placings. Simon Walker went on to become Managing Director of Challenge Business, helping to organise the 2000/1 and 2004/5 Global Challenges.
2015 Could not find what has happened with this class of yachts, but most probably she are still around somewhere.

Djibouti 2000 15 fd sg?, scott?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Ch ... e_1992.2F3

USS LCI(G)-516 landing craft

70th Anniversary of Liberation
As any Islander knows, you can't wander far in Guernsey without coming across its war defences, which act as a stark reminder of the harsh attacks its occupants suffered during World War Two. The first raid, when the island was attacked by air, occurred on June 28, 1940, killing 33 islanders and injuring a further 67.
Thankfully, around 4,000 people - mainly children - had been evacuated in the months before the attack.
The German Occupation began two days later, on June 30, and lasted for almost five years later, when the island was finally liberated on May 9 1945.
This year, which is the 70th anniversary of Liberation, is set to be the biggest celebration in years with a parade including 135 pre-1946 European military vehicles and vintage cars, tractors and motorcycles. Other events including a trilogy of films about the occupation made in Guernsey will be screened at the Town Church.
And Dawn Gallienne, head of philatelic at Guernsey Post, believes it’s really important to commemorate the closure of one of the most difficult periods in the island’s recent history.

On the stamp for postage of a large letter is depict the USS landing craft USS LCI (G)-516.
Built by the New Jersey Shipbuilding Corp., Barber, N.J. for the USA Navy.
09 November 1943 laid down.
08 December 1943 launched as the USS LCI(L)-516
Displacement 246 ton light, 419 ton loaded. Dim. 158.5 x 23.3ft, with a maximum draught when loaded 5.11ft.
Powered by two sets of four GM diesel engines, 1,600 bhp, twin shafts, variable pitch propellers, speed 14 knots.
Endurance by a speed of 12 knots, 4,000 mile.
Armament: 5 – 20mm guns.
Cargo capacity 75 tons, troop capacity 188 men.
Crew 4 officers and 24 enlisted.
11 December 1943 completed. Built in a little more as one month.
During World War II assigned to the Europe-Africa-Middle East Theater.
Took part in the invasion of Normandy from 6 to 25 June 1944.This landing craft were assembled on the south coast of England in various ports.
Took part in the invasion Southern France from 15 August to 18 September 1944.
08 May 1945 took part in the invasion and liberation of Guernsey
15 July 1945 was she reclassified in a Landing Craft Infantry (Gunboat) LCI(G)-516.
1946 Struck from the Naval Register.
26 February 1947 transferred to the US Army.
Fate unknown.

Guernsey 2015 ? sg?, scott?

Source: http://www.navsource.org/archives/10/15/150516.htm Guernsey Post

LARK and BOGOTA

LARK: Can’t find the builder or year when built, the following comes from Log Book volume 14 page 200.
In 1864 the brig LARK ran into a hurricane near the island and became wrecked on the coast. She is said to have been a smuggler and Confederate privateer, and to have had money, in gold and notes, to a value of £35,000 in a heavy chest which her commander, Captain H. Summers, and her First Mate, named HENDERSON, hid ashore. It is said that sometimes afterwards Captain Summers died and that Henderson, apparently then back in the USA managed to find enough money to charter a vessel called the ROVER in which he returned to Tristan da Cunha and dug up the treasure.
What afterwards happened is given in an article in the New Zealand Herald of 11 November 1899.
http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bi ... 11.2.51.16

BOGOTA: Built as an iron ship in Preston, U.K. for Blythe & Co., Liverpool.
Launched as BOGOTA.
Tonnage 383 ton, dim. 135 x 25 x 17.6ft.
Under command of Captain Jones she got on fire on a voyage from Liverpool to? in April 1869 off Tristan da Cunha and was lost.

Tristan da Cunha 1985 60p sg MS389.
Source: Log Book and Lloyds Registry.

OLYMPIA and CZARINA

The OLYMPIA difficult to find some details on her, given in Log Book that she was a German vessel from Hamburg, by looking in American and Lloyds Registers the only German OLYMPIA I could find was built in 1857 at Brake, Germany.
Tonnage 608 ton and dimensions 142.6 x 30.6ft.
Barque rigged, the photo shows a brigantine rigged vessel.
Of her voyages also not much found, in 1859 she made a voyage from Hannover (most probably most of the emigrants were coming from Hannover which is very far inland and the departure port was Hamburg) to Melbourne with emigrants. At that time she was under command of Captain A. Tobias and owned by C.A.H. Tobias & Co., Brake, Germany. Most probably the captain was the owner.
I could not find anything more on the vessel than what is given that she was abandoned near the coast of Tristan da Cunha after springing a leak in 1872, the crew reached Tristan da Cunha in open boats and were taken on board of a passing ship a few days later.

Tristan da Cunha 1985 60p sgMS389. The photo is believed the OLYMPIA.

The CESARENA P or CZARINA another wreck on this MS was an Italian ship of which I have not any info on, she was on a voyage from Leghorn to Bombay when she runs ashore on the west coast of Tristan da Cunha in December1872.

ATKA icebreaker

I got this cover in my possession which carried a 3d stamp of the Ross Dependencies, the stamp attached depict HMS EREBUS. The cover is dated 29 November 1965 and carried by USS ATKA, an interesting icebreaker not only was she sailing under USA flag but also for 5 years under the flag of the Soviet Union. There are a lot of covers for this icebreaker for sale on the net, but most with an American stamp attached.

Built as an icebreaker under yard No 142 by Western Pipe & Steel Company for the USA Navy.
20 July 1942 laid down.
08 March 1943 launched as the USCGC SOUTHWIND (WAG-280).
Displacement 6,515 tons, dim. 82 x 19.4 x 7.85m (draught). Length bpp. 76.2m.
Powered diesel electric by 6 Fairbanks-Morse model 8 1/8OP, 10 Cyl. engines each 2,000 shp, each engine driving a Westinghouse DC electric generator. Two Westinghouse Electric DC electric motors driving the two aft propellers, 1 x 3000 shp Westinghouse DC electric motor driving the detachable and seldom used bow propeller. Speed 13.4 knots. Range 32,485 miles by a speed of 11.6 knots.
When built she carried a armament: 4 – 5 inch twin mounts guns, 6 = 20mm single mounts guns, 2 – depth charge tracks, 6 – “K” guns, 1 Hedgehog, M2 Browning MG’s. and small arms.
Carried 1 Grumman J2F Seaplane or 2 helicopters.
Crew 219.
15 July 1944 commissioned, building cost $9,880,037.00.
The "Wind" Class final design--modelled after the Swedish icebreaker YMER --was prepared by Gibbs & Cox of New York after initial design work by LCDR Edward Thiele, USCG (later the Coast Guard's Engineer-in-Chief) who had obtained details of foreign icebreakers while vacationing in Europe before the war. The Wind- class of icebreakers measured 269 feet in length, 63’6” in beam and displaced 6,500 tons. The Coast Guard contracted for five vessels of the class in November 1941 to fulfil the need to access military bases in Greenland that would be inaccessible during most of the year without the use of heavy icebreakers. Eventually, the Coast Guard operated seven Wind- class icebreakers.
The design of the vessels included a bow propeller used to clear the hull from ice and dredge broken ice forward. The bow propeller was not typically used as a means for propulsion unless the vessel needed to back out of surrounding ice. The vessels also had a diesel electric power-plant, the most compact, economical, and powerful propulsion system available at the time. Additionally, while the diesels provide the power supply, there was a division between these diesels and the motors, which supplied power to the shafts. The rotating electric motors could handle the shocks and extreme power- to- speed ratios necessary for ice operations.
The close spaced frames and careful design of the trusses and planting, along with the thick, welded hull plating made the hulls of the Wind- class unprecedented in strength and structural integrity. The hull also had compressed cork insulation, strengthened steering apparatus, and a padded notch at the stern to nestle the bow of any vessel being towed through ice. Also the design included fore, aft, and side heeling tanks with pumps to aid in water movement within the vessel to rock the ship free from ice build-up. The specifications for construction were so extensive that the Western Pipe and Steel Company of Los Angeles was the only builder to submit a bid. They were originally designed to be equipped with a fixed wing amphibious aircraft.
________________________________________
Cutter History:
USS SOUTWIND CG, was laid down under yard No 142 on 20 July 1942 at San Pedro, California, by the Western Pipe & Steel Company. She was launched on 8 March 1943 and was sponsored by Mrs. Ona Jones. SOUTWIND was commissioned by the Coast Guard on 15 July 1944 under the command of CDR R. M. Hoyle, USCG. She was initially assigned to CINCLANT and was home-ported in Boston, Massachusetts. After a brief period of service along the coast of Greenland where she assisted her sister-ship EASTWIND in capturing German weather teams, including the German supply trawler EXTERNSTEINE, the icebreaker was transferred to the Soviet Union under the terms of lend-lease on 25 March 1945 at Tacoma, Washington. On that date, the SOUTHWIND’s commanding officer, CAPT Richard M. Hoyle, USCG, turned over control of the vessel over to CDR A. M. Khokhlov, USSRN, who was the designated Soviet representative. Renamed ADMIRAL MAKAROV (a famous Russian mariner and naval architect who is recognized as the father of the modern icebreaker) by the Soviets, she came under command of Captain Mikhail Markov Gavrilovic with a crew of 254, the ship operated in the Russian merchant marine, managed by Far Eastern Shipping Company for four-and-one-half years before the Soviet Union returned her to the United States at Yokosuka, Japan, on 28 December 1949.
The vessel was repaired at Yokosuka and, on 28 April 1950, renamed USS ATKA (AGB-3). She was commissioned at Yokosuka by the United States Navy on 1 October 1950 and got underway four days later for the New England coast. Upon her arrival at Boston, ATKA entered the naval shipyard there for a thorough overhaul and modernization. The work was completed late in May 1951, and ATKA began operations from Boston in July.
Throughout her career in the U.S. Navy, the icebreaker followed a routine established by the changing seasons. In the late spring, she would set sail for either the northern or southern Polar Regions to resupply American and Canadian air bases and weather and radar stations. In early fall, she would return to Boston for upkeep and repairs. In the winter, the ship would sail various routes in the North Atlantic to gather weather data before returning to Boston in early spring for repairs and preparation for her annual polar expedition. The ship often carried civilian scientists who plotted data on ocean currents and ocean water characteristics. They also assembled hydrographic data on the poorly charted Polar Regions. ATKA was also involved in numerous tests of cold weather equipment and survival techniques.
She was placed out of commission on 31 October 1966 and transferred back to the Coast Guard, where she was redesignated WAGB-280. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 1 November 1966. During her years as the ATKA, she made a total of 19 trips into Arctic waters and nine extensive voyages to Antarctica.
USCGC ATKA was commissioned in the Coast Guard at Boston on 31 October 1966. She then departed Boston for her new home port of Baltimore, Maryland. On behalf of her crew, and at their unanimous request, the cutter's new commanding officer, CAPT Sumner R. Dolber asked the Commandant if they could rename the ship SOUTHWIND. The request was granted early in 1967. In the Northern Hemisphere summer of 1967, SOUTHWIND participated in Arctic East 1967 during which she served as an escort and supply vessel along both coasts of Greenland. On 30 July she helped locate and repair submarine cables 600 miles above the Arctic Circle.
She departed Baltimore on 16 November 1967 for a five-and-a-half month deployment in support of Operation Deep Freeze 1968. For this trip she carried quite a few Navy personnel. She embarked 33 personnel of CBU-201 (Navy Construction Battalion--Seabees) at Punta Arenas, Chile. Already aboard were two Navy HC-4 helicopters and their crews which embarked the icebreaker at Norfolk, Virginia. The Seabee personnel were transported to Anvers Island where they were scheduled to construct a scientific station that was to be named Palmer Station II. The new station was completed and dedicated on 20 March 1968. While heading home the following day, as she departed Arthur Harbor, she impaled her hull on an uncharted granite "spike" which breeched her hull and caused flooding. Divers went overboard to check the hull,...
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IMO / GUVERNOREN and MONT BLANC

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IMO / GUVERNOREN and MONT BLANC

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Nov 24, 2009 8:12 pm

tmp20C.jpg
Click image to view full size
Built as cargo and livestock carrier by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the White Star Lines.
01 January 1889 launched under the name RUNIC.
Tonnage 4.639 gross, 3.122 net, dim. 131.27 x 13.77 x 9.14m.
Powered by one 3-cyl triple expansion steamengine, manufactured by the ships builder, 424 nhp., speed 13 knots.
1889 Completed.

21 February 1889 sailed for her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York. She and her sister the CUFIC were the first livestock carriers of the White Star Lines.
Carried general cargo outward and returned home with around 1000 life cattle.

1895 Sold to the West India & Pacific SS Co., renamed TAMPICAN.
31 December 1899 transferred to F. Leyland & Co., not renamed.
The same year reboilered, still in the service from Liverpool to New York.
1912 Sold to H.E.Moss & Co., Liverpool, not renamed.
Immediately sold to South Pacific Whaling Co., Christiania (now Oslo), renamed in IMO.
Converted in a whale oil tanker for Antarctic whaling service.

During the First World War was she chartered by the Belgian Relief Commission.
06 December 1917 when she was in ballast steaming across Halifax Bay, Nova Scotia, Canada outward bound with destination New York came she in collision with the French ship MONT BLANC around 08.45 a.m., which was loaded with ammunition and inward bound.
The IMO struck the MONT BLANC abreast of the forward hold, causing some barrels of the 35-ton benzol, carried as deck cargo, to ignite the picric acid in the hold below.
The crew of the MONT BLANC fully aware of the dangers of the cargo on board abandoned the vessel, leaving the blazing MONT BLANC drifting in the stream. The fire attracted many spectators to the waterfront, and she drifted into Halifax’s Pier 6.
Some vessels tried to put a towline on board the burning vessel, and to tow her away from the pier, but at
09.00 the MONT BLANC erupted causing the greatest man made explosion before the Atomic bomb. The blast was felt 120 miles away.
Most part of the densely populated suburb of Richmond was flattened, and within a 16-mile radius 1.630 buildings were destroyed. Only two vessels were lost the MONT BLANC and a wooden schooner the LOLAR, all other damaged vessels in port were later repaired.
Officially 1.963 people were killed, with 9.000 injured and 199 blinded by flying glass, although the casualties aboard the ships in the harbour bring the death toll closer to 3.000.
The captain and the pilot and 5 of de crew of 41 on board the IMO were killed during the explosion, she was hurled across the stream, with most of her upper structure ripped away, and grounded.
After four months the IMO was refloated and towed to New York for repair.
1918 She was rebuilt in a whale factory ship, renamed in GUVERNOREN.

30 November 1921 during heavy fog she ran aground on the rocks at Cow Bay, two miles off Cape Carysfort on East Flakland, all crew were saved.
Salvage attempts were made but the GUVERNOREN was not refloated, and salvage work was halted on 03 December 1921, and she was abandoned to the sea.
Today the wreckage is still there from the waterline up, and lying on her starboard side.


The other ship on fire as seen on the stamp must be the MONT BLANC. The design is wrong, the fire started in the forward hold, and not as seen on the stamp on the afterpart of the vessel.

Built as a cargo vessel under yard No 460 by Sir Raylton Dixon & Co., Ltd. Middelsbrough, U.K. for the Soc. Générale de Transport Maritimes á Vapeur, Marseille.
Launched under the name MONT BLANC.
Tonnage 3.279 gross, 2.251 net, dim. 320 x 44.8 x 15.3ft.
Powered by a triple expansion steam engine 247 nhp. Speed 9.5 knots, one propeller.
June 1899 delivered to owners.

1906 Sold to E. Anquetil, Rouen, France.
1915 Sold to G Petit, Rouen.
1916 Sold to Cie Générale Transatlantique, St Nazaire.

06 December 1917 on a voyage from New York to Halifax under command of Captain Aime Le Medec loaded with a cargo of around 5.000 ton high explosives, she came in collision with the outward bound Norwegian IMO, both ships were under pilot control, and there was plenty of room and it visibility was good.
When both ships approached each other there was a lot of confusion, and a collision happened.
After some barrels of benzol loaded on deck of the MONT BLANC ignited, the crew on board aware of the dangers of the cargo abandoned the vessel and rowed hard for the shore, and just after she landed about 20 minutes later the MONT BLANC did exploded at 09.05 a.m. and she was disintegrated into a mass of wreckage.

Only one men of the crew of the MONT BLANC was lost.

Falkland Islands 2005 £1.20 sg?, scott?


Source: North Atlantic Seaway by Bonsor. Dictionary of Disasters at sea during the age of steam by Hocking. Some web-sites. http://museum.gov.ns.ca/mma/AtoZ/imo.html http://museum.gov.ns.ca/mma/Ato/montblanc.html (A google search gives plenty of sites on this explosion.)
Register of Merchant ships completed in 1899.
aukepalmhof
 
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