SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

HAMINA-CLASS fast attack craft

This Finish stamp shows us one of the Hamina-class fast attack craft, the stamp shows not a pennant no, that one of this class of four ships is depict.

All four were built by Aker Finnyard in Rauma, Finland for the Finnish Navy.
Displacement 250 tons, dim. 51 x 8.5 x 1.7m. (draught).
Powered by two MTU 16V 538 TB93 diesel engines 5,520 kW, two Rolls Royce Kamewa 90SII waterjets. Speed over 30 knots., range 500 mile.
Armament: 1 – Bofors 57mm/70 SAK Mk3, 2 – 12.7mm M.G. 8 Umkhonto-IR SAM (Denel), 4 – RRS-15 Mk2 SSM (Saab), 1 rail for depth charges or mines (sea mine 2000)
Crew 26.

The Hamina-class missile boat is a class of fast attack craft of the Finnish Navy. They are classified as "missile fast attack craft" or ohjusvene, literally "missile boat" in Finnish.
History
The vessels were built in the late 1990s, early 2000s, and are the fourth generation of Finnish missile craft. The first vessel was ordered in December 1996 and the fourth was handed over on 19 June 2006. Since the launch of the Helsinki-class missile boats, all fast attack craft have been named after Finnish coastal cities. The class was previously known also as Rauma 2000 following its predecessor the Rauma class.
The four vessels form what the Finnish Navy calls Squadron 2000 (Finnish: Laivue 2000). Initially the Finnish Navy considered several different compositions for the new squadron, and at one point only two Hamina-class vessels and four Tuuli-class ACV were to have been built. After a strategic shift of the Finnish Navy's role, the composition of the Squadron 2000 followed suit. The Tuuli-class prototype was never fully equipped, nor fitted for operational use and its three sisters were cancelled, instead two more Hamina-class boats have been built; with some of the equipment intended for the Tuulis being used in the Haminas. The fourth and final Hamina-class vessel was delivered in summer 2006.
The squadron reached its full operational capability in 2008 and have greatly improved the surface- and air surveillance as well as air defense capability of the Finnish Navy. Their electronic surveillance suite also increases the quality of information available to military leaders.
All ships were built at Aker Finnyards in Rauma, Finland. The vessels have their home base at Upinniemi.
In March 2014 it was announced that the Hamina-class missile boats will be upgraded in the near future.
MLU (Mid-Life Update
In January 2018, it was announced that the vessels will be equipped initially With Torped 45 and later with Torped 47 torpedoes. It was also announced that new Bofors 40mm Mk.4 guns had been selected as part of the MLU upgrade.
In February it was announced that Finland intended to buy RGM-84Q-4 Harpoon Block II missiles for the Haminas.
Design
The vessel's hull is constructed of aluminum and the superstructures are constructed of re-enforced carbon fiber composite. The vessels have a very low displacement and are very maneuverable. They are equipped with water jets instead of propellers, which allow them to operate in very shallow waters and accelerate, slow down and turn in unconventional ways.
The Hamina class are very potent vessels, boasting surveillance and firepower capacities which are usually found in ships twice the size.
Stealth technology
The Hamina class has been designed and constructed as stealth ships with minimal magnetic, heat and radar signatures.
The shape of the vessel has been designed to reduce radar signature. Metal parts have been covered with radar absorbent material, and the composite parts have radar absorbent material embedded in the structure. Radar transparent materials have been used where applicable.
Unlike glass fiber, carbon fiber blocks radio waves. This protects ship's electronics against electromagnetic pulse. In addition, it stops any radio frequency signals generated by ships electronic devices escaping outside. Except for the bridge, the vessel has no windows that would allow the signals to escape.
The vessel contains hardly any steel parts, thus generating very low magnetic field. The remaining magnetic field is actively canceled with electromagnets.
Exhaust gases can be directed underwater to minimize thermal signature, or up in the air to minimize sound in submarines direction. 50 nozzles around the decks and upper structures can be used to spray seawater on the vessel to cool it. In addition, the nozzles can be used to clean the ship after chemical attack or radioactive fall-out.
Weapons
The Hamina class have the latest in surveillance and weapons technology all integrated into an intelligent command system. A Hamina class vessel can monitor about 200 kilometres (120 mi) of air space and its Umkhonto surface-to-air missile system can simultaneously engage a maximum of eight aircraft, up to 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) away, while the vessel's anti-ship missiles have a range in excess of over 250 kilometres (160 mi).
The Hamina class' primary weaponry is four RBS-15 Mk.3 anti-ship missiles. The vessels are further equipped with a Bofors 57 mm gun against surface and aerial targets as well as the Umkhonto-IR surface-to-air missiles, MASS decoy system and two 12.7 mm heavy machine guns. It is also possible to use the ships for mine-laying.
The software of the centralized combat control system is COTS oriented, built on top of Linux running on redundant x86 rack servers, which makes maintenance and future updates and optimizations simpler.
In early 2018, Finland announced the mid-life upgrade program, which will equip all four boats in the class with new Swedish lightweight anti-submarine warfare torpedoes in the years 2023-2025 and extend the life of the boats to 2035

Vessels
FNS HAMINA
Pennant number: 80
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: December 1996
Commissioned: 24 August 1998
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service.
FNS TORNIO
Pennant number: 81
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: 15 February 2001
Commissioned: 12 May 2003
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service
FNS HANKO
Pennant number: 82
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: 3 December 2003
Commissioned: 22 June 2005
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service
FNS PORI
Pennant number: 83
Builder: Aker Finnyards
Ordered: 15 February 2005
Commissioned: 19 June 2006
Home base: Upinniemi
Current status: In active service

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamina-class_missile_boat

Finland 2018 sg?, scott

VÄINÄMÕINEN or ILMARINEN

The Finish navy did have two coastal defence ships before World War II and one of this is depict on this stamp.The submarine in the foreground is the VESIKKO see viewtopic.php?f=2&t=16336

Both were built on the Ab Crichton-Vulcan Oy in Turkey for the Finish Navy.
The VÄINÄMÕINEN was ordered in 1927 the ILMARINEN in1929.
29 April 1932 launched as the VÄINÄMÕINEN.
Displacement 3,900 ton, dim. 93.0 x 16.8 x 5.0m. (draught)
Powered diesel electric by four Krupp engines each 1,173 hp each, two shafts, speed 14.5 knots.
Range 700 mile by 14.5 knots.
Armament: 2 – 254 mm Bofors, 4 – 105mm Bofors, 4 – 40mm Vickers and 2 – 20mm Madsens when built, four 20mm Madsens added in 1944.
Crew 410.
28 December 1932 commissioned.

VÄINÄMÕINEN was a Finnish coastal defence ship, the sister ship of the Finnish Navy's flagship ILMARINEN and also the first ship of her class. She was built at the Crichton-Vulcan shipyard in Turku and was launched in 1932. Following the end of the Continuation War, VÄINÄMÕINEN was handed over to the Soviet Union as war reparations and renamed Vyborg.[i] The ship remained in Soviet hands until her scrapping in 1966.
Design
VÄINÄMÕINEN and ILMARINEN were planned to be mobile coastal fortresses for the defence of the Finnish demilitarized islands at Åland in particular. The two ships were not well suited for the open seas due to a design with emphasis on operations in the shallow waters of the archipelago: it has been said that they were volatile and rolled too much. The minimal depth keel, together with the high conning tower, made the ships' movements slow and wide. It was said that the ships were uncomfortable, but harmless to their crews.
The ship's heavy armament of 254-millimetre (10 in) Bofors guns could fire shells of 255 kilograms (562 lb) up to 31 kilometres (19 mi).
Fire control
In fire control, the two coastal ships were identical. The fire control centre and the gun towers were connected electrically so that ranging and orders could be given without spoken contact. With the aid of mechanical calculators, the values were transferred directly to the gun towers.
Operational history
Winter War
During the Winter War, the two coastal defence ships were transferred to the Åland islands to protect against invasion. When the ice cover started to become too thick in December, the ships were transferred to Turku, where their anti-aircraft artillery aided in the defence of the city.
Continuation War
The only time VÄINÄMÕINEN and ILMARINEN fired their heavy artillery against an enemy was at the beginning of the Continuation War, during the Soviet Red Army evacuation of their base at the Hanko Peninsula. VÄINÄMÕINEN also participated in the distraction manoeuvre Operation Nordwind on 13 September 1941, during the course of which her sister ship ILMARINEN was lost to mines.
In 1943 "Detachment VÄINÄMÕINEN", which consisted of VÄINÄMÕINEN, six VMV patrol boats and six motor minesweepers, was moved east to take positions along the coast between Helsinki and Kotka. She did not actively participate in many operations, since the heavier Soviet naval units never left Leningrad, where they were used as floating batteries during the siege. As a result, VÄINÄMÕINEN's primary operational duties were to patrol the Gulf of Finland between the minefields "Seeigel" and "Nashorn", as well as protection of the German-Finnish anti-submarine net across the gulf.
During the Soviet assault in the summer of 1944, the Soviets put much effort into trying to find and sink VÄINÄMÕINEN. Reconnaissance efforts revealed a large warship anchored in Kotka harbour and the Soviets launched an air attack of 132 bombers and fighters. However the target was not VÄINÄMÕINEN — instead it was the German anti-aircraft cruiser NIOBE .
Postwar
After the end of the Continuation War VÄINÄMÕINEN was handed over as war reparations to the Soviet Union. The ship was handed over on 29 May 1947 to the Soviet Baltic Fleet, where she was renamed VYBORG. The ship served over 6 years in the Red Fleet at the Soviet base in Porkkala, Finland. The ship was called Vanya (a Russian short form of the name Ivan) by the sailors of the Baltic Fleet.
VYBORG was modernized during the 1950s and served for a while as an accommodation ship in Tallinn. Preparations to scrap the ship were begun in 1958. During this time, there were talks to return the ship to Finland. The ship was, however, scrapped in 1966 at a Leningrad scrapyard. According to Soviet calculations, 2,700 tons of metal were recovered.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V%C3%A4in ... fence_ship

The ILMARINEN was also ordered in September 1929.
09 July 1932 laid down.
09 September 1933 launched as ILMARINEN.
She has the same details as her sister.
17 April 1934 completed.

ILMARINEN was a Finnish Navy Panssarilaiva ("Armored ship"; a coastal defence ship by British classification). The unit was constructed at the Crichton-Vulcan shipyard in Turku, Finland, and named after the mythological hero ILMARINEN from the Finnish national epic, the Kalevala. ILMARINEN was the flagship of the Navy from 1 May 1933 until her demise on 13 September 1941.
During the early inter-war period the Finnish Navy consisted of some 30 ex-Russian vessels, most of them taken as war-trophies following the civil war. Never ideal types for the navy's needs, they were generally old and in poor condition. In 1925, a tragic incident highlighted the sorry state of the navy. An old torpedo boat was lost in a fierce storm, taking with her the entire crew of 53. A heated debate started, and intensive lobbying led to the adoption of a new Finnish Navy Act in 1927.
Prior to World War II, the fleet renewal program led to the acquisition or construction of five submarines, four torpedo boats, and two coastal defense ships. Among the last of their kind, VÄINNÄNÖINEN and ILMARINEN were two of the most concentrated naval artillery units ever built. They were designed by the Dutch company NV Ingenieurskantoor voor Scheepsbouw (a front for German interests circumventing the Treaty of Versailles), and were optimized for operations in the archipelagos of the Baltic Sea. Their open sea performance was de-emphasized in order to give the vessels their shallow draft and super-compact design.
Coastal defence ships were particularly popular in the Nordic countries, and began serving in the navies of Denmark, Sweden and Norway early in the 20th century. These vessels typically had heavy armament and good armor protection, but were relatively slow. Their sizes were around 4,000 tons, main armament consisted of guns between 210 and 240 mm (8 and 9 in), the armor corresponded to that of armoured cruisers, and speeds were between 15 and 18 knots (28 and 33 km/h; 17 and 21 mph). A coastal defence ship was somewhere between a cruiser and a monitor: slower than a cruiser but better armed, faster than a monitor, but with smaller guns. The coastal defence ships also varied among themselves; some of them were closer to cruisers, and others, such as the Finnish ones, were closer to monitors.
Being the second of her class, ILMARINEN was launched at the Turku shipyard on 9 September 1933. The ship went through its finishing trials and was handed over to the Finnish Navy on 17 April 1934. Her sister ship Väinämöinen had preceded her by two years.
The vessels had a compact design, with a high mast and large turrets for main and secondary artillery. Foreign comments on their design ranged from puns to praise. Not truly designed for open sea operations, the ships had a tendency to roll slowly and widely even in moderate seas. Travel on them was unpleasant, but deemed safe. Additional keels were later fitted, which improved the situation somewhat.

HSU FU bamboo raft

Ancient Chinese texts tell the story of Hsu Fu, a navigator and explorer sent by the first Emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang, in 218 BC into the "Eastern Ocean" in search of life-prolonging drugs. Hsu Fu completed the voyage on a bamboo raft, which some believe took him to America and back.

Tim Severin set out to prove that such a voyage really could have been made. On the beach at Sam Son, Vietnam, he oversaw the construction of a 60-foot (18.3 m) long, 15-foot (4.6 m) wide raft built of 220 bamboos and rattan cording, and driven by an 800 square foot (74 square metre), junk-rigged sail. After leaving Asia in May 1993, Severin and his crew faced monsoons, pirates, and typhoons before the rattan began rotting and the raft began falling apart in the mid-Pacific. After travelling 5,500 miles (8,850 km) in 105 days, they were forced to abandon the raft about 1,000 miles (1,600 km) short of their destination.

Although the Hsu Fu, as the craft was named, did not complete the trip, Severin believed the voyage had accomplished its purpose. In The China Voyage, published in 1994, he wrote that the expedition had proved that a bamboo raft of the second century BC could, indeed, have made a voyage across the Pacific, just as Hsu Fu's account recorded.

More on the voyage you can find on: http://www.personal.psu.edu/pjc12/From% ... dition.htm

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Sever ... oyage_(May–November_1993)
Surinam 2018 SRD 19.00 sg?, scott?

VESIKKO submarine

For the 100th year anniversary of the Finnish Defence Force in 2018, the Finnish Post issued a booklet on which two stamps have a maritime theme.
One stamp shows a submarine with in the background another Finnish warship, I found the photo after which the stamp was designed on the net, and which give that the submarine VESIKKO is depict and the vessel in the background is an armed coastal vessel of which the Finnish Navy had two vessels before World War II, the VÄINÄMÖINEN and IIMARINEN, which is shown is unknown. The photo shows more vessels but they are not depict on the stamp.

The coastal submarine was built under yard no 707 by the Crichton-Vulcan Dock in Turku, Finland.
09 October 1930 ordered.
07 March 1931 laid down.
10 May 1933 launched as CV 707.
Displacement 254 ton surfaced, 303 ton submerged, dim 40.90 x 4.07 x 8.18m (height), draught 3.79 surfaced.
Powered diesel electric by two MWM RS 127S 6-cyl. diesels each 350 hp and two Siemens Pgvv 322/36 electro motors each 132 kW. Speed surfaced 13 knots, submerged 8 knots.
Test depth 150 metre.
Armament 3 – 53.3 cm bow torpedo tubes, carried 5 torpedoes. 1 – 20mm Madsen MG AA. 1 12.7mm MG.
Crew 16.
30 April 1934 commissioned in the Finnish Navy.
19 January 1936 in service as the VESIKKO.

VESIKKO is a submarine (the single ship of her class), which was launched on 10 May 1933 at the Crichton-Vulcan dock in Turku. Until 1936 it was named by its manufacturing codename CV 707. VESIKKO was ordered by a Dutch engineering company Ingenieurskantoor voor Scheepsbouw (a German front company) in 1930 as a commercial submarine prototype. Purchased by the Finnish before the war, she saw service in the Winter War and World War II, sinking the Soviet merchant ship VYBORG as her only victory. After the cease-fire with the Allies in 1944, VESIKKO was retired. Finland was banned from operating submarines after the war and she was kept in storage until she was turned into a museum ship.
VESIKKO was one of five submarines to serve in the Finnish Navy. The other four were the three larger Vetehinen-class boats VETEHINEN, VESIHIIS, IKU_TURSO and the small SAUKKO . The word "VESIKKO" is the Finnish name for the European mink.

Development and design
Ingenieurskantoor voor Scheepsbouw (IvS), was a German front company in the Netherlands, established to secretly design a new German submarine fleet. According to the terms of the Versailles Peace Treaty after World War I, Germany was banned from building and operating submarines among other "offensive" weaponry. This resulted in moving the armaments' research to foreign countries. For example, German tanks and aircraft were tested and developed in the Soviet Union. Therefore, unlike the other submarines in the Finnish Navy, VESIKKO was not part of the Naval Act. Instead, it was part of the secret rebuilding of the German Navy, the Reichsmarine.
The objective of Germans was to design a modern submarine type to be used during general mobilization; technology and standards were to be new and not based on World War I designs. For this purpose two prototypes were built, E1 in Spain and CV 707 in Finland. The latter was later chosen as a first submarine type for the new fleet. Construction of both of these experimental submarines was funded by the Reichsmarine.
Commander Karl Bartenbach, who had retired from active service in the Reichsmarine, worked as secret liaison officer in Finland. His official title was Naval Expert of the Finnish Defence Forces, and it was under his leadership that the 496-ton Vetehinen class and the 100-ton SAUKKO were built in Finland. Both submarine types were designed by IvS. For the German Navy, his mission was to oversee the developing and construction of a 200–250 ton submarine, which would still equal the combat effectiveness of the Vetehinen class. The whole task was named The Lilliput Project.
The official decision allowing VESIKKO to be constructed in Finland was made in 1930 after several meetings with the Finnish Government. Since The Liliput Project broke the terms of the Versailles Peace Treaty, there was no mention of Germany in the agreement, and it was decided that the new submarine could only be sold to nations belonging to the League of Nations. The would-be buyers also had to have the rights to own such a weapon. The Finnish Government gained primary rights to purchase the submarine.

The construction of CV 707 begun in 1931 at the Crichton-Vulcan dock in Turku. At the time of its construction, CV 707 was one of the most advanced submarine designs. For example, the maximum depth was over twice that of earlier German submarines, and its hull could be built completely by electric welding. By eliminating rivets there was increased resistance to water pressure, decreased oil leakages, and the construction process was faster. Germans tested CV 707 in the Archipelago of Turku during 1933–34.
VESIKKO was a prototype for the German Type II submarines. Six Type IIA submarines (U-1 to U-6) which were almost identical to VESIKKO were built in the Deutsche Werke dock in Kiel, and after these, 44 Type IIB, IIC, and IID submarines were built before and during World War II.

Service history
According to the agreement between the Finnish Ministry of Defence and the Crichton-Vulcan company, Finland had the primary purchase option until 1937, and the Finnish Government took over the submarine during August 1934. After the Finnish Parliament had approved the acquisition in 1936, the submarine joined the Finnish Navy under the name of VESIKKO.

Winter War
VESIKKO was deployed with VESIHIISI to the Hanko region on 30 November 1939 as several Soviet surface combatants were headed towards the area. However the submarine failed to arrive in time to intercept the KIROV and its escorts. VESIKKO was able to get close enough to see the cruiser but was unable to reach firing position as it had to evade shellfire. When on 17 December and on two following days the Soviets sent the battleship OKTYABRSKAYA ROYOLYUTSIYA to bombard Finnish positions at Koivisto, the Finnish Navy decided to send out VESIKKO to hunt for it. However, by the time the submarine reached the area a day later the Soviet battleship MARAT which bombarded on that day had already departed and temperature had dropped to −15 °C (5 °F) which prevented the submarine from diving.

Continuation War
In summer 1941 all Finnish submarines were once again readied for combat operations and they sailed to the staging area in the Gulf of Finland. VESIKKO's base of operations was to be Vahterpää island near the town of Loviisa. When the Continuation War started on 25 June, all submarines were ordered to patrol the eastern part of the Gulf of Finland. On 3 July 1941 VESIKKO sank a Soviet merchant ship named VYBORG east of Gogland island. The attack was made 700 metres (770 yd) from the target; first one torpedo was launched at 13:25 which hit the stern of the target. The target stopped but did not appear to be sinking so VESIKKO fired another torpedo which failed to explode. Very soon after the strike, three Soviet patrol boats started to chase VESIKKO and tried to destroy it with depth charges and salvage the damaged ship but failed to accomplish either task. VYBORG sank on 3 July at 14:15.
Soviet historiography later downplayed the sinking of VYBORG, insisting that several submarines and German naval bombers had assaulted the ship simultaneously, and that over twenty torpedoes had been launched against it. During fall 1941 VESIKKO operated from Helsinki and made three patrols to the coast of Estonia. In 1942, equipped with depth charge rack, she acted as an escort to convoys in the Sea of Åland, and hunted suspected hostile submarines near Helsinki.
In the beginning of June 1944, VESIKKO escorted the...

L'HIRONDELLE and the pirate Le Méme

François-Thomas Le Même (Saint-Malo, 13 January 1764 — WALTERSTOW, at 30S 79E, 30 March 1805) was a French privateer.
Career
Le Même was born in Saint-Malo in the family of an accountant, and studied in order to enlist in the navy. At the age of 14, he enlisted as a volunteer on the merchantman POUPONNE, which departed Saint-Malo in early 1778, bound for Northern America. After the outbreak of the War of American Independence, Le Même returned to Brest on the GENTILLE.
Le Même enlisted on the privateer PRINCE-DE-MONTBARREY which, after taking a number of prizes, was herself captured by a frigate on 28 June 1779. Exchanged the following year, Le Même served on the ships LYS PILOTE-DES-INDES and PETITE GUÉPE, which he learnt that the war had ended. Replacing the lieutenant of the ship MARIE CONSTANCE, Le Même sailed to Le Havre.
Le Même then sailed on various merchantmen, rising to the rank of captain on 5 January 1790. He served as a lieutenant on the MISSISSIPPI, before taking command of the LIBERTÉ, bound for the Indies. He departed on 3 September 1791 and arrived at Mauritius before sailing to Pondicheri and Bengal, before returning to Port-Louis. Le Même then took command of the 130-ton brig HIRONDELLE, and cruised to Java and Sumatra, returning to Mauritius in March 1793
At the outbreak of the French Revolutionary Wars, Le Même converted HIRONDELLE into a privateer, arming her with twelve 4-pounder guns and recruiting a 110-man crew He then departed to prey on Dutch commerce. On 16 August 1793, HIRONDELLE met the brig the 18-gun GOOD-VERWAGTING, under Lieutenant Raken, and captured her by boarding. Le Même sent a prize crew under Lieutenant Legars on GOOD-VERWAGTING and continued his cruise. On 25 August, HIRONDELLE met the 40-gun East Indiaman WILLIAMS THESIED, under Captain John Thomson; boarded at once by both HIRONDELLE and GOOD VERWAGTING, WILLIAM-THESIED surrendered after a 40-minute battle. HIRONDELLE then returned to Port-Louis with her prizes.
Le Même transferred on the 32-gun privateer VILLE-DE-BORDEAUX, with a 200-man complement, keeping Legars as his lieutenant. He reached Padang in mid-December 1793, stormed the fortress, and captured the Dutch trading post, which he ransomed. He then sailed to Sunda Strait to patrol the area, but an epidemic aboard forced him to abbreviate his cruise and return to Mauritius. While in transit, on 12 February 1794, VILL-DE-BORDEAUX met the Portuguese SAINT-SACREMENTO sailing from Bengal to Lisbon, and captured her. A few days later, a storm separated VILLE-DE-BORDEAUX from her prize; SAINT-SACREMENTO reached Mauritius on 25 February and VILLE-DE-BORDEAUX, on the day after. Le Même was awarded 1 100 000 livres tournois in prize money.
Le Même next captained the privateer AMPHIITRITE a prize taken by Sercey's squadron in the Indian Ocean and sold by the colonial government of Mauritius; AMPHIITRITE was old and in poor condition, and after cruising off Cape of Good Hope without taking any prize, she sprang leaks and foundered in Bombetoka Bay, forcing her crew to return to Mauritius on small ships
Le Même then sailed on the privateer L’UNI before transferring on CLARISSE, and retired. He started a career and a businessman, in which he lost his 1,400,000 livre tournois fortune.
In 1803, with the outbreak of the War of the Third Coalition, Le Même took command of the 360-ton three-masted privateer FORTUNE; on 26 January 1804, FORTUNE fought an indecisive battle against the British frigate BOMBAY. After a six-month cruise, he returned to Mauritius with eight prizes. On 20 August 1804, FORTUNE departed Mauritius to take station in the Persian Gulf area, where she captured the 16-gun East Indiaman brig FLY after a 30-minute battle. FLY carried 50,000 piastres for the British government. FORTUNE continued her patrol and captured a number of smaller prizes.[
Le Même then decided to cruise off Gujarat; on 7 November, around 10:00, FORTUNE met the frigate HMS CONCORDE, under Captain John Wood. CONCORDE had been dispatched specifically to hunt for FORTUNE, and even had a 60-man reinforcement to her crew for the battle. FORTUNE attempted to flee and CONCORDE gave chase, resulting in a race that lasted for several hours before CONCORDE overhauled her opponent. Le Même resisted fiercely before striking his colours at 22:15. Captain Wood treated his prisoner with great courtesy and returned to Bombay; FORTUNE, in poor state after the battle, limped in several days later.
Fate
Le Même embarked on the East Indiaman WALTERSTOW, bound for England, which departed on 15 February 1805. Aboard, he fell ill and died of sickness on 30 March at 30S 79E.
(31 December 1801 is given that the HIRONDELLE under command of Le Méme was captured by the British frigate HMS SYBILLE under command of Captain Charles Adams. In the history of this frigate I can’t find anything on this capture. After this capture she disappears. Le Méme was taken prisoner.)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fran%C3%A ... _M%C3%AAme
Mauritius 1972 1R sg461, scott 398.

DEEP WATER HARBOUR ANTIGUA 1968

Antigua issued in 1968 five stamps for the opening of the new Deep Water Harbour in 1969 which shows us three stamps which depict prints of the old harbour in 1768 and 1829, and two with the new harbour in 1968 of which the 25c and 35c shows us a cargo and a passenger vessel, which are not identified.

The Bay of St Johns Harbour was used already by the first settlers at that time more as an anchorage and the cargo was discharged on or loaded from ship boats or lighters.

The new harbour was constructed in 1968 and opened to commercial traffic in 1969. The harbour was constructed for break bulk cargo handling but when containers took over most of this trade the harbour was not so suitable for containers.
Later two new piers were constructed for handling four cruise vessels.

Source: Internet
Antigua 1968 2c/$1 sg 221/25, scott? (the 15c is designed after a print made in 1829)
$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]$post_attachment_names[$j]

THORSHAMMER whale factory vessel

The full index of our ship stamp archive

THORSHAMMER whale factory vessel

Postby aukepalmhof » Fri Nov 27, 2009 8:05 pm

tmp1E9.jpg
Click image to view full size
thorshamr.jpg
Click image to view full size
Tristan da Cunha issued a set of stamps for the 50th Anniversary of the Norwegian Scientific Expedition to the island in 1937.
One of the largest sponsors of the expedition was Lars Christensen, the owner of the whale-factory vessel THORSHAMMER.
The expedition travel south in whale-factory vessels, and during their stay the expedition was able to describe rare species of fauna, and new species of plants and grasses with links to adjacent continents.
Five scientific volumes, several books, and numerous papers resulted from these studies.

After four months on the island, 12 members of the expedition were taken back to Norway in the whale-factory vessel THORSHAMMER.

Built as a tanker under yard No 459 by W.Doxford & Sons, Sunderland, U.K. for Eagle Oil Transport Co. Ltd., London.
09 June 1914 launched under the name SAN NAZARIO.
Tonnage 10.064 gross, dim. 525.5 x 66.5 x 41.4ft.
Triple expansion Doxford 4-cyl steam engine 795 nhp., speed 11 knots.
September 1914 delivered to owners.

At that time she was the largest tanker in the world.

23 July 1928 bought by A/S Bryde & Dahl’s Hvalfangerselkap (Lars Christensen) Sandefjord, Norway and converted in a whale factory vessel.
Tonnage 12.215 gross, 7.147 net, 16.050 dwt. Dim. 535.0 x 66.5 x 41.5ft
Renamed in THORSHAMMER.
1931/32 Further rebuilt in Rotterdam. Then managed by A/S Thor Dahl.

When in January 1941 the German surface raider PINGUIN (HK33) surprised the Norwegian whaling fleet in the Antarctic, only the THORSHAMMER under command of Capt. Einar Torp, and her seven chatchers escaped to Grytviken, South Georgia.

Whaling was later resumed but under guard of the British armed merchant cruiser QUEEN OF BERMUDA and CARNAVON CASTLE.
11 April 1941 she sailed to New Orleans to discharge her valuable whale oil.
Then she made an other whaling voyage to South America west coast off Peru in the fall of 1941, but when Japan entered the Second World War, whaling was suspended during the rest of the war.
The THORSHAMMER was the rest of the war used as a tanker.

After the war again refitted in a whale-factory vessel by Framnæs Mekaniske Verksted in 1948, and Harland & Wolff at Liverpool in 1949.
1952 Sold to Thor Dahls Hvalfanger A/S, Sandefjord, Norway.
1963 Bought by Cant. Nav. Santa Maria, La Spezia, Italy, she arriver there on 06 September 1962 for scrapping.

Tristan da Cunha 1987 50p sg437, scott?

Source: Register of Merchant Ships completed in1914. Watercraft Philately Vol. 35 page 16.
http://www.warsailors.com/freefleet/norfleett2.html Pesca, A History of the Pioneer Modern Whaling Company in the Antarctic by Ian B. Hart.
Last edited by aukepalmhof on Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
aukepalmhof
 
Posts: 5529
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:28 am

Re: THORSHAMMER whale factory vessel

Postby aukepalmhof » Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:04 pm

2017 norwegian expedition.jpg
Click image to view full size
This four stamps don’t show a ship, but the THORSHAMMER who picked the expedition members up from Tristan da Cunha is on a stamp.

Norwegian Tristan Expedition 1937-1938

Anne Vaalund, Museum of University History, University of Oslo

The expedition was led by the botanist Erling Christophersen. In the spring 1933 the Botanical Museum of the University of Oslo received a parcel of botanical samples collected on Gough Island. They were collected by the whaling ship-owner Lars Christensen in just a few hours, but despite this, the collection contained 12 species new to this island, and three previously undiscovered species. Christophersen was intrigued with Tristan da Cunha, and started to plan an expedition.
Earlier scientific expeditions to these islands had stayed for less than a week, whereas this lasted for four months, from December to March. This was the whaling season in the Antarctic summer. The whaling industry was important in Norway and essential for the expedition. The botanist Christophersen contacted Christensen for funding and support, and he was more than willing to help. His whale factory ships could transport the expedition to the island at the start of the season and pick up the crew on the way back to Norway.
The expedition had 13 participants and could hardly have been more multi-disciplinary with: botanist, algologist, land zoologist, marine zoologist, geologist and a surveyor. But this was not only meant to be a science expedition. In 1937 there were 188 Tristanians on the island who were to be studied by a physician, a dentist and a sociologist.
The expedition members arrived onshore 7 December, 1937. They brought with them equipment weighing 100 tonnes, including building materials for the research stations. They were given a warm welcome and were installed in the parish hall until the expedition station was erected.
The dentist and the physician had their field lab inside the expedition station. On the 35p stamp the physician Henriksen and the medical assistant Oeding are photographed while doing lab work. The man in the background is the sociologist P.A. Munch. He, of course, had no need for a lab. He visited the Tristanians in their homes and observed them in their work to study the society.
The dentist Sognnæs had his field lab and a dentist chair with all equipment next to this lab. He was intrigued by the good dental health in the population. He wanted teeth for his lab research and the deal he offered was a chocolate bar for a tooth!
The goal of the expedition was to collect everything of interest. To do this, one needed to map the terrain. The 70p stamp shows surveyor Crawford at work. He started out mapping the coastline and worked towards the centre of the island. Later, official maps were made based on his surveys. The geologist Dunne analysed the volcanic islands, asking questions like when were they formed and how has the climate shaped them over time.

The £1 stamp shows Tristanians lined up on a bench outside the field station where they were tested for tuberculosis by the physician Henriksen. The population wasn’t just known for their good dental health, but also for their good health in general. Henriksen joined the expedition to try to understand why they were so healthy.
The biologists did fieldwork around the island, and from boats around the coast. In addition to the main island, they did fieldwork at the islands Inaccessible and Nightingale. To get to these islands they had hired the Norwegian adventurer Erling Tambs with his Norwegian Spitzgatter RS SANDEFJORD. The islands are populated with many birds. The land zoologist Hagen led the work of ring marking two thousand Great Shearwaters (Puffinus gravis). Some of them were later found outside Newfoundland and in Norway. They also found a Tristan thrush (Nesocichla eremita) which was considered extinct. On the £1.50 stamp from Nightingale the marine biologists Baardseth and Sivertsen are watching Hagen together with a Northern rockhopper penguin. They are sitting outside their simple field lab, with walls of tussocks grass.
On 29 March the whaling factory THORSHAMMER arrived. The field station and most of the remaining equipment was given to the Tristanians. A small gift compared to all the help the expedition had received during the months on Tristan da Cunha. Back home in Norway the expedition members analysed their research materials and in the following years published more than 50 scientific papers from this expedition to Tristan da Cunha.
Expedition members:
Erling Christophersen (Botanist and leader), Egil Baardseth (Algeologist), Allan B. Crawford (Surveyor from England), J.C. Dunne (Geologist from South Africa), Ragnar Eggesvik (Radio Operator), Yngvar Hagen (Land Zoologist), Sverre Dick Henriksen (Physician), Yngvar Mejland (Botanical Assistant), Peter A. Munch (Sociologist), Per Oeding (Medical Assistant), Erling Sivertsen (Marine Zoologist), Severin Skjelten (Handyman), Reidar Sognnæs (Dentist)

Technical details:-
Photographs courtesy of Museum of University History, University of Oslo
Printer: Cartor Security Printing
Process: Lithography
Perforation: 13 ½ x 13 ¼ per 2 cms
Stamp size: 28 x 42mm
Sheet Layout: 10
Release date: 7 December, 2017
Production Co-ordination: Creative Direction (Worldwide) Ltd

Source: http://www.pobjoystamps.com/contents/en ... -1938.html
Tristan da Cunha 2017 35p/£1.50 sg?, scott?
aukepalmhof
 
Posts: 5529
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:28 am


Return to Ship Stamps Collection

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], Google Adsense [Bot] and 93 guests

cron