SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
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A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

BON ACCORD RNLB lifeboat

This stamp comes from a sheet showing rescue vessels issued in the name of the Solomon Islands. As soon as I saw the building in the background I thought that this was in Aberdeen and a recent visit to the city in April 2016 confirmed it.
I am now going to make an assumption, as no serial number is shown on the stamp, that the vessel shown on the stamp is the RNLB BON ACCORD which is the Severn Class lifeboat based at Aberdeen. Every so often the lifeboat goes off for a service/refit in another port and is replaced by a boat of the same class from the RNLI relief fleet. However, this does not happen very often which makes me believe that the lifeboat shown is RNLB BON ACCORD – 17-24.
RNLB BON ACCORD was built in 2000 by Green Marine/Berthon at Lymington on the south coast of England. She has the RNLI serial number 1248 and has been based at Aberdeen since July 2000. RNLB BON ACCORD is powered by two 27 litre twin turbo intercooled Caterpiller 3412 DITA engines which deliver 1250hp each at 2300rpm. She carries 1200 gallons of diesel in her bunkers and burns, at full speed, 2 gallons of diesel per minute. She has a range of 250nm at full speed. Aberdeen Lifeboat carries a crew of 6 and, if required, a doctor. She is moored afloat, as all Severn Class Lifeboats are.

RNLB BON ACCORD is the third lifeboat to be stationed at Aberdeen, bearing the Bon Accord name. The previous two Bon Accords were built in 1853 and 1875 and stationed at Footdee and the harbour as the Beach and Harbour Lifeboats until 1924.

The name Bon Accord comes from the motto of the City of Aberdeen’s Coat of Arms. The phrase was used in the 14th century as a password by King Robert the Bruce as he and his men laid siege to Aberdeen Castle and killed the English Garrison, retaking Aberdeen for the townspeople.

Whilst in Aberdeen I was lucky enough to see BON ACCORD sailing into Aberdeen Bay on a training exercise on 18/4/2016 and was almost able to duplicate the shot shown on the stamp except my photo was taken from a road overlooking the River Dee while the shot on the stamp appears to have been taken from the river bank. The oil rig vessel FAR SCOTSMAN almost ruined the shot !

Solomon Islands 2014 $5.00 sg?, scott?

Sources: http://aberdeen-lifeboat.org.uk/lifeboats/. The Lifeboat Service in Scotland, Station by Station by Nicolas Leach. Lifeboat Directory, A Complete Guide to British Lifeboats by Nicholas Leach and Tony Denton (lists all current lifeboats, those that have been sold on to other lifeboat agencies in other countries and many of the older lifeboats that have been sold in to private hands or preserved. An excellent reference work; PCC).

Peter Crichton.

ARRC Autonomous Rescue & Recovery Craft

From a sheet of rescue vessels issued in the name of the Maldives.
Delta has launched one of the largest RIB’s in the world. After years of development, Seawork 2005 saw the first public appearance of this latest model at the cutting edge of RIB technology.
Designated the AARC (Autonomous Rescue & Recovery Craft) this Delta 19m has many novel features. The sponsons are a hybrid construction that allows the craft to take advantage of the energy absorption properties of an air filled tube with the damage resistance of closed cell foam. Carbon fibre shafts have permitted the engines to be placed in the optimum position without the weight penalty that conventional steel shafts would incur, and the cabin is a double decker.
The ARRC is an integral part of "Jigsaw", BP's innovative Rescue initiative for their North Sea platforms which will provide enhanced Rescue & Recovery arrangements. In an emergency, helicopters will be deployed from strategically located platforms with the ARRC acting as the marine element. Each ARRC will have a crew of six including a fully trained paramedic and is capable of operating in seas of 7 m significant wave height.
In the event of an emergency rescue, the ARRC has the facilities on board to house 21 survivors in comfort and to perform essential triage and basic life-saving initiatives including Cannulation, Intubation and Haemorrhage Control. In addition the ARRC has a clear aft deck area that enables a "Helivac" of seriously injured survivors to be completed in the severest of sea states.
Powered by twin 1000 hp CAT 18's linked to Hamilton 521 Waterjets and with the latest onboard Navigation & Ship control systems linked to Hi Visibility LCD displays she is capable, in continuous mode, of cruising at 30 kts. Top speed is currently commercially sensitive but dependent on loaded condition it is understood to be well in excess of 35 kts.
Following the initial sea trials in early June, Delta Managing Director Charles Dyas said that he was delighted that such a leading edge craft should perform so well "out of the box" commenting that the performance predicted by one of the most comprehensive series of tank tests ever undertaken in a boat of this size were born out in real life.
The initial production plan for all boats was for the hull and deck to be moulded by a specially formed company, Delta ARRC Ltd (DAL), in Stockport, Cheshire, England. The superstructures for boats 01, 02 were moulded by Blondecell and their successors, Composite Mouldings Ltd, and the remainder at Stockport by DAL.
Initially, it was planned that fitting out, and joining of the superstructure to the deck would take place at Holyhead Marine in Anglesey, Wales. In the event, only boats 01 to 04 were fitted out at Holyhead, and boats 05 to 08 were assembled at the Wear Dry Dock, Sunderland, England as the result of an internal decision by DAL.
Eight ARRC's which are due to come into service with BP are specifically engineered for their Rescue & Recovery role but this craft is obviously so versatile that derivatives for other Patrol duties are already under development.
Two ARRCs were carried on board BP’s Caledonian class oil rig supply vessels on special launching cradles. In April 2015 BP announced that it intended to end the use of autonomous rescue and recovery craft (ARRC) and end the provision of the Jigsaw helicopter capability for search and rescue provision.

In April2015 the company stated that it was terminating the use of the ARRC vessels — introduced in 2009 to improve safety in the North Sea — as they were frequently underused.

The end of the Jigsaw helicopter came as a result of the decommissioning of the BP Miller platform where the Jigsaw helicopter was based.

While the Jigsaw helicopter has been replaced by a new employer-funded SAR helicopter, this is based at Aberdeen International Airport and can only provide rescue and recovery, and medevac cover for offshore workers out to around 160 nautical miles from the shore.

Whilst in Aberdeen in April 2016 I was told that the 8 ARRC vessels are now laid up at South Queensferry Marina, near the Forth Road Bridge. The launching cradles have been removed from the Caledonian class rig supply vessels.

The vessels were named – 01 ERIK, 02 SCOTT, 03 PAUL, 04 IAN, 05 EUAN, 06 JAMES, 07 ALASTAIR and 08 DAVID.

I am attaching some of my photos of the ARRCs and one of their Mother Vessels. The ARRCs and smaller rescue craft carried my rig supply and rescue vessels are referred to as Daughter Craft.

Sources: http://www.journalofoceantechnology.com ... id=6&jot... (Reviews & Papers). http://hotribs.com/03press/198-delta-ri ... a-ribs.asp. https://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/a-d ... yY15nKTWos. David Dodds of Aberdeen.

Peter Crichton
__._,_.___

Louisa Craig- barque 1876

The iron barque Louisa Craig was built as the «Peru» in1876 for Robertson, esq. She measured 183 ft. in length, 30 ft. beam, 710 gross tons. Captain James Craig, later owner of Craig lines, was the first master on her maiden voyage to the west coasts of North and South America, then to Buenos Aires and back to the west coast, home to Falmouth for orders and then Hamburg. Captain James Craig handed over command to Captain R. Smith who sailed her round the world, to Adelaide, Valparaiso, Talcahuana and back to Europe, arriving in August 1879. During the next twenty seven years, under various owners, part owners and masters she traded in many countries making a number of voyages to New Zealand. In 1906 she came under the flag of Craig Ltd. and was placed in the trans-Tasman trade. In 1907 her name was changed to the «Louisa Craig» and she was re-painted in the line's livery of painted ports, black bulwarks and grey hull. This accentuated her lines and she was generally admitted to be the most beautiful and striking ship in Australia. She made thirty voyage in the intercolonial trade and one to the Pacific Islands under the ownership of Craig and then, in 1916 she was sold to G.H.Scales of Wellington and placed in the trans-Pacific trade to the west coast of North America. After her first voyage Scales changed her name to «Raupo». She remained under ownership of Scales until 1921 when she was laid up in Wellington. In 1922 she was sold as a coal hulk and towed to Lyttelton. After years as a coal hulk she was gradually cut down to the waterline for her iron, and then, in 1937, she was towed to Quail Island in Lyttelton Harbour and beached. The design stamp is made after painting of Roger Morris:«Вarque Louisa Craig sailing up the Northern Wairoa River to Kopu».
Malawi 2011;k250;SG? Source:http://www.seapainter.com/Louisa-Craig.Northern-Wairoa.html

«Ulcoats»-the little clipper 1863

The «Ulcoats», one of the White Star ships, was an iron barque of 671 tons, built at Liverpool in 1863. She was iron and her registered tonnage was 671. She was a small ship but a little clipper belonging to the same line which owned the Thermopylae. She made her maiden trip to Auckland, leaving London on September 29, 1863, with 137 passengers, and arriving at Auckland on January 22, 1864, making the passage in 115 days, a very good run for a vessel of her size. Captain Chambers, who was in command, reported that owing to very adverse weather in the Channel, where she was detained eight days, and subsequent light winds, the vessel was thirty days fetching Madeira. She experienced good north-east and south-east trade winds, and on December 10 passed the meridian of the Cape, running down her longitude in the parallel of 46deg south, with strong winds and fine weather with the exception that on December22 she encountered a cyclone, in which fore and main topsails and lifeboat were lost. Cape Maria Van Dieman was sighted on january 10; thence the barque was baffled on the coast with light airs and calms, the vessel taking another 12 days to reach Auckland. Among the passengers by the Ulcoats on this voyage were Mr Wesley Spragg and others who have made good citizens. The Ulcoats, after discharging, sailed for Port Chalmers, arriving there on march 13, 1864. She landed 54 passengers for Dunedin, and then loaded at that port for London. According to the book «White Wings» - Sir Henry Brett. The design stamp is made after painting of Roger Morris: «The Aberdeen White Star ship Ulcoats bringing immigrants to Auckland on June 16th. 1865.»
Malawi 2011;k350;SG?
Source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.anc ... lcoats.htm. http://www.seapainter.com/Ulcoats-Auckland.html

Manus canoe

Тhe name of the Manus is the traditional name for a group of fishing people who inhabit coastal areas Manus. These people were good sailors and traders. The Manus live in houses on the sea and understand various means of navigation the canoe and the use of the great fishnet . They have knowledge of the moon and stars and of those kinds of magic in which betel and lime are used. The Manus are a sea-dwelling peoples. The Manus, in their large, single outrigger canoes, control the fishing and the trade of the south coast, and are the middlemen between Usiai and the island Matankor. There are two kinds of canoe: those used for fishing and those used for traveling. Single-fishing canoe of the Manus Islands in the northwest part of the group. Dugout hull; sides generally raised with washstrakes, sewn on. Raked ends elongated, terminating in a platform. Thwarts rested on notches in the hull or, where present, in the washstrakes; a gunwale pole rested on the thwarts and outrigger booms. Sharp ended float, about two thirds the length of the hull, attached by 3 booms. Each boom flanked by flexible spars along its outer part; spars turned down toward the ends and were lashed outside the multiple vertical stanchions that connected the booms and float. Single mast, stepped between the gunwale pole and the hull and braced from the platform. The triangular Oceanic lateen mat sail set; boom at the foot forked against the mast, holding the sail up obliquely.
Papua New Guinea 2009;K3,0;SG?
Sources: A. Haddon, J. Hornell: Canoes of Oceania.1937.Volume II. Dictionary of the world’s Watercraft from Aak to Zumbra. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Russian Navy Ships

Republic of West Papua is the name given to this unrecognized state the separatist of Free Papua movement. This movement claimed sovereignty for Western New Guinea, which combines the Indonesian province of Papua and West Papua. The capital is Jayapura, the capital of Papua province, near the border with Papua New Guinea. Republic of West Papua, then called West Papua, declared its independence on 1 December 1961, during the first meeting of the Papuan Congress, even when Dutch sovereignty. West Papua has issued a small sheet with the ships of Russian Navy: 1.Goto Predestanatsiya; 2. Ingermanland 3. Eagle; 4. Battle of the mouth of Nevy. Information of ships and battle see, shipstamps co.uk. forum.
Republiс of West Papua 2013;3000;SG? Source: https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rep%C3%BA ... _Ocidental
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EXXON VALDEZ tanker

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EXXON VALDEZ tanker

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Dec 22, 2009 8:16 pm

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Built under yard no 438 as a crude tanker (VLCC) by National Steel & Shipbuilding Co (NASSCO), San Diego for the Exxon Shipping Co., Philadelphia.
29 July 1985 keel laid down.
June 1986 launched under the name EXXON VALDEZ.
Tonnage 110,831 gross, 71,330 net, 214,861 dwt., dim. 300.8 x 50.6 x 38.2m., draught 26.8m.
One Sulzer Oil 2SA, 8-cyl engine, 31,650 bhp, speed 16.25 knots, crew 21.
10 December 1986 completed.

Built for the transport of crude oil from Valdez to Panama for subsequent transportation to Gulf and east Coast ports in the USA, as well as crude to West Coast USA ports.

On 23 March 1989, the supertanker EXXON VALDEZ pulled out of Valdez, Alaska, loaded with more than 56 million gallons of crude oil.
Captain Joseph Hazelwood, the master of the vessel had spent the day drinking with crew members.
Bartenders testified that he had consumed at least eight vodka doubles, and Coast Guard tests showed his blood alcohol level stood at 241- more than six times the permissible level under Coast Guard regulations.
Third mate Gregory Cousins was on duty beyond the limits specified by federal fatigue laws.
Hazelwood, Cousins and the rest of the crew faced a night voyage through ice in the Prince William Sound.

Hazelwood intoxication was evident from the alcohol on his breath, his speech (captured on audiotape) and, most of all, his actions as his ship navigated the Sound. While passing through fishing grounds, Hazelwood took the EXXON VALDEZ outside established shipping lanes to avoid ice. He put the vessel on automatic pilot accelerating directly at Bligh Reef.
Hazelwood then left the bridge in violation of federal pilotage regulations. As he went below, he gave vague instructions to the inexperienced and fatigued Cousins.
At four minutes past midnight on 24 March 1989 the supertanker struck Bligh Reef, (about 25 mile from Valdez) spilling 11 million gallons of oil, “the largest oil spill and greatest environmental disaster in American history,” claimed news report.
The grounding punctured eight of the eleven cargo tanks, and within four hours 5.8 million gallons had been lost.
By the time the tanker was refloated on 5 April 260.000 barrels had been lost and 2.600 square miles of the country’s greatest fishing grounds and the surrounding virgin shoreline were sheated in oil.

After the spill and the removal of the oil from the tanker the EXXON VALDEZ sailed to San Diego, under command of a new captain, for repairs by NASSCO.

Captain Hazelwood, who had a record of drunk driving arrests, was charged with criminal mischief, driving a watercraft while intoxicated, reckless endangerment, and negligent discharge of oil.
He was found guilty of the last count and fined $ 51.000 and sentenced to 1.000 hours of community service in lieu of six months in prison.

In 1990 the American Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, which barred the EXXON VALDEZ and 17 other vessels from Alaskan waters. A provision banning entry by any ship that had spilled more than 1 million gallons after 22 March 1989 was tacked onto the Act.
As a result, Exxon sent the renamed vessel EXXON MEDITERRANEAN, after repair, to carry oil from the Middle East to Europe and the Far East ports.

In 1990, Exxon Shipping Co., President Gus Elmer said “Due to declining Alaskan crude oil, the vessel will enter foreign service, most likely loading crude oil in the Mediterranean or the Middle East. It is consistent with our policy that the vessel be named according to their location.

Exxon officials declined to retrofit the ship with a double hull because it was not feasible from an engineering standpoint, an Exxon spokeswoman said in March 1990.
However a National Steel spokesman said, “It’s feasible to put a double hull. The question is the cost and the time.”

In the mid 1990’s Sea River Maritime (Exxon’s shipping subsidiary) filed a lawsuits to allow the former EXXON VALDEZ to return to Alaskan waters. They stated that the vessel was not financially viable trading in foreign waters.
In 1998, a judge upheld the ban. In a recent Appeal Court case in October 2002 the ban was again upheld.
It has been reported that in 1993 she was renamed in S/R MEDITERRANEAN and that she was mothballed (laid up) and anchored off a foreign port that the owners will not name.
From being repaired in 1990 until its lay-up, the vessel made 190 voyages around the world.
April 2005 renamed in MEDITERRANEAN, owned by Seariver International Inc., Marshall Islands flag and registry.
February 2008 sold to Hong Kong Bloom Shipping Ltd., renamed DONG FANG OCEAN, she was refitted in a ore carrier, managed by Cosco Shanghai Ship Management, Shanghai.
2008 Registered at Panama.
April 2012 sold to Best Oasis Ltd. Mumbai, India, renamed ORIENTAL NICETY, under Sierra Leone flag. She was sold for scrapping.
The same month renamed by owners in ORIENTAL N., Sierra Leone registry. (source http://www.equasis.org )

Exxon Valdez denied the right to die in India

09 May 2012 Lloyds List
BULK carrier Oriental Nicety is refusing to bow out of shipping quietly, after the Indian authorities denied it entry to Alang for recycling following a row that only adds to the vessel’s notoriety.
The bulker that was formerly the very large crude carrier Exxon Valdez caused one the worst oil spills in history in Alaska in 1989. Renamed Oriental Nicety, it was scheduled to arrive in Alang today, according to broker reports.
However, vessel-tracking data from Lloyd’s List Intelligence shows that the vessel is at anchor near Malaysia.
According to international media reports, the authorities denied the ship entry until India’s Supreme Court rules on a petition by the Research Foundation for Science urging the authorities to turn the vessel away, alleging that it contains toxic waste.
The court is expected to hear the case on August 13.
Converted into an ore carrier in 2007, the 1986-built vessel, now operated by Coshipman, was reported sold on an as-is basis in Singapore for $460 per ldt, or $15.8m, at the end of March.
If the vessel cannot make it to India, it is likely to turn to China or to end its days on the beaches of Bangladesh.


IMO No. 8414520

Marshall Islands 1998 60c sg?, scott?
Sao Thome et Principe 2010 15000 DBMS sg?, scott?, (the other ship is the ATLANTIC EMPRESS on 35000 Db.)

Source: Watercraft Philately Vol. 49/50 P.Crichton. Ships of the World by Lincoln P.Paine. Marine News.
Some web-sites.
aukepalmhof
 
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