Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year. Full membership includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.


In 2007 Italy and San Marino both celebrate the 200th anniversary of Giuseppe Garibaldi’s birth, Italy issued one stamp and San Marino three stamps.
The Italian stamp shows the port of Nice designed after an old photo of the port with ships which can’t be identified, the home were Garibaldi was born., and a close-up of Giuseppe Garibaldi.
The San Marino stamps, only one stamp depict a watercraft, a landings-boot used during the landing on 11 May 1860 at Marsala, most probably a boat from one of the ships who transported Garibaldi and his troops to Marsala, the man standing in the bow of the boat looks like he is Garibaldi.
Garibaldi and his troops were welcomed by revolutionary troops who joined the Thousand to conquer the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies. The conquest is represented with the landing in Marsala.

Italy 2007 0.65 Euro sg?, scott?
San Marino 2007 1.40 Euro sg?, scott?
Source: Italy and San Marino Post.

SEAWOLF (SSN-21) USS submarine

Built as a nuclear attack submarine under yard No 253 by General Dynamics Electro Boat Co., Groton for the USA Navy.
25 October 1989 laid down.
24 June 1995 launched as the USS SEAWOLF (SSN-21) one of the Seawolf class. one sisters, the last of this class is longer.
Displacement 7,460 tons standard, 9,137 tons full load, dim. 1007.6 x 12.9 x 11m. (draught).
Powered by one S6W PWR nuclear reactor, 52,000 shp, one shaft, pumpjet propulsor, speed + 35 knots.
Range, unlimited, endurance, till food supplies run out.
Diving depth + 800 feet.
Armament: 8 – 26 inch torpedo tubes, 40 torpedoes, 50 missiles or 100 mines.
Crew 140,
19 July 1997 commissioned.
USS SEAWOLF (SSN-21), the lead ship of her class, is the fourth submarine of the United States Navy named for the seawolf, a solitary fish with strong, prominent teeth and projecting tusks that give it a savage look. The contract to build her was awarded to the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics and Newport News Shipbuilding on 9 January 1989 and her keel was laid down on 25 October 1989. She was launched on 24 June 1995, sponsored by Mrs. Margaret Dalton, and commissioned on 19 July 1997 with Commander David M. McCall in command.
USS SEAWOLF was a product of the Cold War, designed as a replacement for the Los Angeles-class submarines and as a response to the Soviet Akula class. According to the Navy's "Undersea Warfare" magazine, SEAWOLF is quieter at high speed than a Los Angeles submarine is pierside. Originally 29 were planned for production, but with the end of the Cold War, the cost was judged to be prohibitively high and only three were built (SEAWOLF , CONNECTICUT and JIMMY CARTER) in favor of the smaller Virginia-class submarines, which were expected to be about 10% cheaper.
Between 25–27 March 2006, a series of anti-submarine warfare exercises were held in Hawaiian waters that included SEAWOLF; Carrier Strike Group Nine; the nuclear-powered attack submarines CHEYENNE, GREENVILLE, TUCSON and PASADENA, as well as land-based P-3 Orion aircraft from patrol squadrons VP-4, VP-9, and VP-47.
On 22 July 2007, the submarine transferred from her previous homeport of Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, Connecticut, to permanently reside at SubBase Bangor in Silverdale, Washington.
Adding support personnel as well as ship's crew, there are 140 personnel attached to SEAWOLF.
USS SEAWOLF featured in a 1998 episode of the documentary Super Structures of the World: SEAWOLF. The programme followed her construction and sea trials.
2015 In service.

TRITON submersible

The submersible TRITON 3300/3 is built by Triton Submarines LLC at Vero Beach, Florida USA.
Weight 8000 kg, dim. 4.0 x 3.0 x 2.5m. (height).
Main thrusters 2 x 5 hp, speed 3 knots. Vertran thrusters 2 x 5 hp.
Endurance 10 hours.
Reserve oxygen for 96 hours.
Payload 350 kg.
Diving depth 1,000 metres
1 Pilot and 2 passengers.

It is the most popular type built by the company and available to civilian buyers for recreational use. She is a type manufactured by the company and her name is given for the depth she can dive 3300 ft.
The first 3300/3 made his maiden dive in 2011, work on number 3 had commenced in January 2012, and all three were built for use on superyachts.
Building cost USA$ 3 million.

Solomon Islands 2013 $7 sg?, scott1507a.
Source: Triton submersible website and various other web-sites.


Built as an iron hulled barque under yard No 75 by Bartran, Haswell & Co., at South Dock, Sunderland U.K for Thomas Dunlop & Co., Glasgow.
18 February 1874 launched as the CLAN MACLEOD, christened by Mrs. McCallum.
Tonnage 671 grt, 646 nrt, 629 tons underdeck, dim. 54.71 x 9.54 x 5.33m.
Her building cost was £11,375. Homeport Glasgow.
Crew 17 men.
April 1874 completed.

Her maiden voyage was under Captain William Alexander with coal to the west coast of South America via Cape Horn.

The JAMES CRAIG is a three-masted, iron-hulled barque restored and sailed by the Sydney Heritage Fleet, Sydney, Australia.

Built in 1874 in Sunderland, England, by Bartram, Haswell, & Co., she was originally named CLAN MACLEOD. She was employed carrying cargo around the world, and rounded Cape Horn 23 times in 26 years. 1887 Was she sold to Sir Roderick W. Cameron, Glasgow not renamed. In 1900 she was acquired by Mr J J Craig, renamed JAMES CRAIG on 14 December 1905, named after a son of the owner. After she was bought by Craig she began to operate between New Zealand and Australia until 1911.
1911 Sold to British New Guinea Development Co., striped and used as a copra hulk in Port Moresby.
1919 Sold to H. Jones & Co. (Pioneer Line) and was re-rigged in Sydney. Used in the trade between the USA and Australia and New Zealand. Like many other sailing ships of her vintage, she fell victim to the advance of steamships, and was first laid up, then used as a hulk
Unable to compete profitably with freight cargo, she was sold to the Catamaran Coal Company in late 1925 who used the JAMES CRAIG as a coal hulk in Recherche Bay to serve as a bunker for the coal brought to the wharf., until eventually being abandoned at Coal Pit Bay in Tasmania in 1930. In 1932 she was sunk by fishermen who blasted a 3-metre hole in her stern.
Her register was closed on 15 February 1957.
Restoration of JAMES CRAIG began in 1972, when volunteers from the 'Lady Hopetoun and Port Jackson Marine Steam Museum' (now the Sydney Heritage Fleet) refloated her and towed her to Hobart for initial repairs. Brought back to Sydney under tow in 1981, her hull was placed on a submersible pontoon to allow work on the hull restoration to proceed. Over twenty-five years, the vessel was restored, repaired by both paid craftspeople and volunteers and relaunched in 1997. In 2001 restoration work was completed and she goes to sea again. A DVD on her restoration has been produced and available from the Sydney Heritage Fleet.
Current situation
JAMES CRAIG is currently berthed at Wharf 7 of Darling Harbour, near the Australian National Maritime Museum. She is open to the public, and takes passengers out sailing on Sydney Harbour and beyond. She is crewed and maintained by volunteers from the Sydney Heritage Fleet. The cost of maintaining her is approaching $1 million a year and the ship relies on generating income from visitors alongside, charters, events, and regular fortnightly daysails with up to 80 passengers.
The ship has now made historic return voyages to Hobart (2005, 2009, 2011 and 2013) and to Port Philip (Melbourne and Williamstown) in 2006 and 2008. The voyages to Hobart to coincide with the Wooden Boat Festival (one of the largest in the world).
In October 2013 James Craig participated in the International Fleet Review 2013 in Sydney, Australia.
Historical value
JAMES CRAIG is of exceptional historical value in that she is one of only four 19th century barques in the world that still go regularly to sea. She sails out through the Sydney heads fortnightly, when not on voyages to Melbourne, Newcastle or Hobart. As such she is a working link to a time when similar ships carried the bulk of global commerce in their holds. Thousands of similar ships plied the oceans in the 19th and early 20th centuries linking the old world, the new world, Asia and Oceania. She is sailed in the traditional 19th Century manner entirely by volunteers from the Master to the galley crew. Her running rigging consists of 140 lines secured to belaying pins and spider bands. Many of the crew know each rope by name. She achieved 11.3 knots on a return voyage from Melbourne in February 2006 and "she was loving every minute of it!"

More information on her history is given on: ... aig-story/

Solomon Island 2015 $12.00 sg?, scott?
Source: Internet. Lloyds Registry.


Built as a wooden yacht by the Estaleiro Maccarini, Navegantes S.C., Brazil for Frank Walker a Brazilian industrialist. He was also the designer of the ship.
1986 Laid down.
1989 launched under the name AVANY.
Displacement 400 ton, dim. 48.16 x 10.36 x 4.72m. (draught) length at waterline 33 metre, on deck 38 metre.
Powered by two Cummins diesel engines, each 400 hp, twin screws, speed 14 knots.
Accommodation for 8 passengers and 7 crew.
Completed ?

PEACEMAKER is an American barquentine owned by the Twelve Tribes religious group.
The PEACEMAKER, originally named AVANY, was built on a riverbank in southern Brazil using traditional methods and tropical hardwoods, and was launched in 1989. The original owner and his family motored in the southern Atlantic Ocean before bringing the ship up through the Caribbean to Savannah, Georgia, where they intended to rig it as a three-masted staysail Marconi rigged motor sailer. The work was never done, however, and in the summer of 2000, it was purchased by the Twelve Tribes, a religious group with 50 or so communities in North and South America, Europe, and Australia. They spent the next seven years replacing all of the ship’s mechanical and electrical systems and rigging it as a barquentine. The refit vessel set sail for the first time in the spring of 2007, under the name PEACEMAKER.
Barquentine rigged. Sail area 930 m³
Accommodation for 6 crew and 5 trainees.
The Peacemaker is used to travel between the communities of the Twelve Tribes while providing an apprenticeship program for their youth in sailing, seamanship, navigation, and boat maintenance.
The ship has a United States Coast Guard attraction vessel permit and is available for festivals and dockside hospitality events.
The PEACEMAKER has a large deckhouse and spacious cabins finished in mahogany, modeled after the interior of the CUTTU SARK. It also has an innovative transom that can be lowered while in port to reveal a watertight bulkhead with two large doors opening into a cargo area and fully equipped workshop.
Present day
In 2013, the PEACEMAKER participated in the Tall Ships 1812 Tour, a pan-provincial event that traveled throughout Ontario during the summer of 2013, commemorating the bicentennial of the War of 1812. Sixteen ports participated in this event which partnered with the Tall Ships Challenge Great Lakes 2013 series. The first port of call for the tour was Brockville, Ontario, June 14-16, 2013.
On August 15-17, 2014, the PEACEMAKER will be docked in Port Washington, WI, and featured during the 2014 Port Washington Maritime Heritage Festival.
Over Independence Day weekend 2014, The PEACEMAKER will participate in the 14th Annual Thunder Bay Maritime Festival at the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary/Heritage Center in Alpena, Michigan.
The ship was at port in Ludington, Michigan, on July 12-13 available for public tours.
2015 She is for sale, asking price 3 million dollar.

Solomon Island 2015 $12.00 sg?, scott?
Source: Internet.


Built as a steel hulled fishing logger under yard No 35 by the VEB Rosslauer Schifswerft at Dessau-Rosslau, East Germany.
Launched as the VILM named after the island of Vilm.
Displacement as tanker 429 empty, 491 full load, dim. 38.50 x 7.20 x 3.40m
One diesel engine, speed 9.5 knots.
Crew 11.
Before she was completed was she towed to the Peene Werft, Wolgast and rebuild in a tank-supply vessel for the East German Navy.
01 April 1952 delivered.

Roald Amundsen (often abbreviated Roald; named in honor of Norwegian polar explorer Roald Amundsen), originally named VILM, is a German steel-ship built at the Elbe River in 1952. Having worked in different areas, she was refitted in 1992 to 1993 as a brig (two-masted square-rigged sailing ship) and now serves as a sail training ship. During summer, she usually operates in the Baltic Sea, and usually embarks for journeys to farther destinations for winter, including several trans-Atlantic crossings.
Ship history
The hull of the ship was built at the shipyard Rosslauer Werft at the Elbe River in Rosslau, German Democratic Republic, in 1952. Originally intended for fishing as a deep sea fishing lugger, plans were changed before the completion of the ship, and she was then instead built as a type of tanker, receiving her final completion at the shipyard Peene-Werft in Wolgast, Germany, at the shore of the Baltic Sea.
Named VILM, the ship was put to use for the National People's Army (NVA), first as a tanker and supply vessel, operating out of Peenemünde and crewed mainly by civilian seamen. Converted to a transporter for bilge water in the 70s on the Peene-Werft, the VILM then made regular trips to the bases of the National People's Army to take the ships' bilge water to a centralized treatment facility. This service was discontinued at the end of 1988.
After not having been used for a year, the VILM was towed to Neustadt in Holstein and there at the navy base used as living quarters. At the beginning of 1991, the ship was put up for sale by the Vebeg GmbH, a corporation to sell federal property.
Detlev Löll and Hanns Temme bought the ship at an auction and, with the help of some of the former crew, sailed the ship to Wolgast in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. In spring 1992, a complete overhaul began, in the course of which the ship received a new exterior keel and was refitted as a brig; the rig includes five square sails at each mast and includes lifting yards for the upper-three yards (upper main topsail, topgallant and royal) at each mast, lowering the center of gravity of the ship when sails are furled. The overhaul was subsidized by the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and the Bundesagentur für Arbeit and formed part of the job creation program „Fridtjof Nansen“ (led by the owner), which comprised the refitting of this ship as well as the FRIDTJOF NANSEN and the NOBILE.
In 1993, the ship was put to its new use under the name of ROALD AMUNDSEN. It was chartered by the newly founded sail training club „LebenLernen auf Segelschiffen e.V.“ (short: LLaS; German: learning to live on sailing ships). After a short intermezzo with another sail-training club, „Segelschiff Fritjof Nansen e.V.“, in 1993, the ROALD AMUNDSEN has since been chartered by the LLaS and used for sail training.
ROALD AMUNDSEN now operates all year around as a sail training vessel with voyages lasting between one and three weeks. Her home port is Eckernförde, a harbour city in Schleswig-Holstein near Kiel in northern Germany. Summer months are spent with voyages on the Baltic Sea from Denmark to Baltic countries or the North Sea. Winters are spent in warmer regions. The ROALD AMUNDSEN has repeatedly crossed the Atlantic Ocean, bound for South American ports in Brasil and French Guiana (1998), for tall ships events in North America (2000, 2010), and for the Caribbean (2001, 2011/12, 2012/13). Further destinations include Iceland (1995), England and Ireland (2006), the Mediterranean (2006/07, 2007/08), the Canary Islands (1995), and others. During her North American voyage in 2010, the ROALD AMUNDSEN visited the Great Lakes and there met with the US brig NIAGARA; the two brigs formed an unofficial friendship, and as of 2013, the ROALD AMUNDSEN still flies a flag of the NIAGARA at some occasions such as the Tall Ship Parade at Kiel Week.
The ship has participated in the Tall Ships' Races and is rated as a Class A tall ship by Sail Training International.

Specifications as the ROALD AMUNDSEN.
Length over all: 50,20 m
Length of hull: 40,80 m
L.W.L. (Length of waterline): 38,20 m
Width/beam: 7,20 m
Draft: 4,20 m
Mast total height: 34,00 m
Sail Area: 850,0 m² (square meters)[with 18 sails]
Crew: 31 Trainees plus Crew quarters [17 Regular Crew]
Motor: 300 PS (220 kW) 8-cylinder (Buckau-Wolff Diesel motor)
Generators: 1x 48 kW; 1x 53 kW
Displacement: 480 t
GRT: 298
ballast: 180 t
ballast tanks: 108 t
call sign: DARG
MMSI: 211215170
IMO No: 8994489
STAG-Sail-No: TS G 508
Ensign / flag: Germany
Equipment: Radar, echo sounder, Global Positioning System, Automatic Identification System, magnetic compass, LRC Long Range Radio, EPIRP-buoye, Inmarsat, short wave radio, Life Rafts, Zodiac, personal safety equipment (rescue vests etc.)

Solomon Islands 2015 $12 sg?, scott? Internet.


The full index of our ship stamp archive


Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Dec 22, 2009 8:16 pm

Click image to view full size
Click image to view full size
Built under yard no 438 as a crude tanker (VLCC) by National Steel & Shipbuilding Co (NASSCO), San Diego for the Exxon Shipping Co., Philadelphia.
29 July 1985 keel laid down.
June 1986 launched under the name EXXON VALDEZ.
Tonnage 110,831 gross, 71,330 net, 214,861 dwt., dim. 300.8 x 50.6 x 38.2m., draught 26.8m.
One Sulzer Oil 2SA, 8-cyl engine, 31,650 bhp, speed 16.25 knots, crew 21.
10 December 1986 completed.

Built for the transport of crude oil from Valdez to Panama for subsequent transportation to Gulf and east Coast ports in the USA, as well as crude to West Coast USA ports.

On 23 March 1989, the supertanker EXXON VALDEZ pulled out of Valdez, Alaska, loaded with more than 56 million gallons of crude oil.
Captain Joseph Hazelwood, the master of the vessel had spent the day drinking with crew members.
Bartenders testified that he had consumed at least eight vodka doubles, and Coast Guard tests showed his blood alcohol level stood at 241- more than six times the permissible level under Coast Guard regulations.
Third mate Gregory Cousins was on duty beyond the limits specified by federal fatigue laws.
Hazelwood, Cousins and the rest of the crew faced a night voyage through ice in the Prince William Sound.

Hazelwood intoxication was evident from the alcohol on his breath, his speech (captured on audiotape) and, most of all, his actions as his ship navigated the Sound. While passing through fishing grounds, Hazelwood took the EXXON VALDEZ outside established shipping lanes to avoid ice. He put the vessel on automatic pilot accelerating directly at Bligh Reef.
Hazelwood then left the bridge in violation of federal pilotage regulations. As he went below, he gave vague instructions to the inexperienced and fatigued Cousins.
At four minutes past midnight on 24 March 1989 the supertanker struck Bligh Reef, (about 25 mile from Valdez) spilling 11 million gallons of oil, “the largest oil spill and greatest environmental disaster in American history,” claimed news report.
The grounding punctured eight of the eleven cargo tanks, and within four hours 5.8 million gallons had been lost.
By the time the tanker was refloated on 5 April 260.000 barrels had been lost and 2.600 square miles of the country’s greatest fishing grounds and the surrounding virgin shoreline were sheated in oil.

After the spill and the removal of the oil from the tanker the EXXON VALDEZ sailed to San Diego, under command of a new captain, for repairs by NASSCO.

Captain Hazelwood, who had a record of drunk driving arrests, was charged with criminal mischief, driving a watercraft while intoxicated, reckless endangerment, and negligent discharge of oil.
He was found guilty of the last count and fined $ 51.000 and sentenced to 1.000 hours of community service in lieu of six months in prison.

In 1990 the American Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, which barred the EXXON VALDEZ and 17 other vessels from Alaskan waters. A provision banning entry by any ship that had spilled more than 1 million gallons after 22 March 1989 was tacked onto the Act.
As a result, Exxon sent the renamed vessel EXXON MEDITERRANEAN, after repair, to carry oil from the Middle East to Europe and the Far East ports.

In 1990, Exxon Shipping Co., President Gus Elmer said “Due to declining Alaskan crude oil, the vessel will enter foreign service, most likely loading crude oil in the Mediterranean or the Middle East. It is consistent with our policy that the vessel be named according to their location.

Exxon officials declined to retrofit the ship with a double hull because it was not feasible from an engineering standpoint, an Exxon spokeswoman said in March 1990.
However a National Steel spokesman said, “It’s feasible to put a double hull. The question is the cost and the time.”

In the mid 1990’s Sea River Maritime (Exxon’s shipping subsidiary) filed a lawsuits to allow the former EXXON VALDEZ to return to Alaskan waters. They stated that the vessel was not financially viable trading in foreign waters.
In 1998, a judge upheld the ban. In a recent Appeal Court case in October 2002 the ban was again upheld.
It has been reported that in 1993 she was renamed in S/R MEDITERRANEAN and that she was mothballed (laid up) and anchored off a foreign port that the owners will not name.
From being repaired in 1990 until its lay-up, the vessel made 190 voyages around the world.
April 2005 renamed in MEDITERRANEAN, owned by Seariver International Inc., Marshall Islands flag and registry.
February 2008 sold to Hong Kong Bloom Shipping Ltd., renamed DONG FANG OCEAN, she was refitted in a ore carrier, managed by Cosco Shanghai Ship Management, Shanghai.
2008 Registered at Panama.
April 2012 sold to Best Oasis Ltd. Mumbai, India, renamed ORIENTAL NICETY, under Sierra Leone flag. She was sold for scrapping.
The same month renamed by owners in ORIENTAL N., Sierra Leone registry. (source )

Exxon Valdez denied the right to die in India

09 May 2012 Lloyds List
BULK carrier Oriental Nicety is refusing to bow out of shipping quietly, after the Indian authorities denied it entry to Alang for recycling following a row that only adds to the vessel’s notoriety.
The bulker that was formerly the very large crude carrier Exxon Valdez caused one the worst oil spills in history in Alaska in 1989. Renamed Oriental Nicety, it was scheduled to arrive in Alang today, according to broker reports.
However, vessel-tracking data from Lloyd’s List Intelligence shows that the vessel is at anchor near Malaysia.
According to international media reports, the authorities denied the ship entry until India’s Supreme Court rules on a petition by the Research Foundation for Science urging the authorities to turn the vessel away, alleging that it contains toxic waste.
The court is expected to hear the case on August 13.
Converted into an ore carrier in 2007, the 1986-built vessel, now operated by Coshipman, was reported sold on an as-is basis in Singapore for $460 per ldt, or $15.8m, at the end of March.
If the vessel cannot make it to India, it is likely to turn to China or to end its days on the beaches of Bangladesh.

IMO No. 8414520

Marshall Islands 1998 60c sg?, scott?
Sao Thome et Principe 2010 15000 DBMS sg?, scott?, (the other ship is the ATLANTIC EMPRESS on 35000 Db.)

Source: Watercraft Philately Vol. 49/50 P.Crichton. Ships of the World by Lincoln P.Paine. Marine News.
Some web-sites.
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