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l'HERMIONE replica

Built as a wooden replica of the original ship, built by Asselin at Le Chantier de Arsenal at Rochefort France for Association Hermione-La Fayette, France.
1995 Ordered
06 July 2012 launched as the HERMIONE a replica of the 1779 built Concordia class frigate HERMIONE.
Displacement 1,166 tons, dim. 65 x 11.24 x 5.78m. (draught)
Sail auxiliary three masted full rigged, oak hulled wooden warship, sail area 2,200 m².
May 2013 she made her first sailing trial on the Charente River.
Armament: total of 32- (non-functional replica) guns, 26 -12 pdr, and 6 – 6 pdr. guns
Crew 80.
2015 Completed.
The HERMIONE is a Concorde class frigate, completed in Rochefort by the Asselin organisation in 2014. She is a reproduction of the 1779 HERMIONE, which achieved fame by ferrying General Lafayette to the United States in 1780 to allow him to re-join the American side in the American Revolutionary War.
This project was conceived by members of the Centre International de la Mer in 1992, and construction began in 1997, envisaging a launch in April 2015 (as compared to the original, which took less than a year to build).
The shipyard was in one of the two dry docks beside the Corderie Royale at Rochefort.
As far as possible, traditional construction methods were used although modern power tools were substituted for the period tools on some jobs. The site is open to the public, and admission fees help fund the project.
English plans of a sister ship, CONCORDE, were used. The cost was estimated to be $22 million. The original plans had been modified in several ways for reasons of strength and safety: planks had been bolted rather than pegged to avoid movement during the long period of construction. Similarly, the mast sections were fastened with glue rather than metal hoops to avoid water penetration. The cannons are lightweight and non-functional to save weight, and for safety reasons. Hemp rigging was used, and the sails made of linen.
An engine will be used for safety, and electric generators for lighting and basic amenities.
2015 voyage
In preparation for a transatlantic voyage in 2015, the frigate departed from Rochefort and started her sea-worthiness trials on 7 September 2014.
In April 2015, HERMIONE started her return voyage to the United States. HERMIONE’s itinerary is meant to reaffirm the relationship between the United States and France.

St Pierre et Miquelon 2015 1.38 Euro sgMS?, scott? ... ione_(2014)


A nice set of Portugal with local craft used for fishing, I am wondering by this craft where the crew is, the crafts are under full sail and have a nice bow-wave so she are underway without a crew.
Located on the south-western edge of Europe, Portugal was classified as a border country by geographer Orlando Ribeiro. Boats travelling from the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea, which had been visiting the country since ancient times, strongly influenced Shipbuilding, leading Portuguese shipwrights to adopt two distinct techniques: Nordic clinker planking (overlapping planks and an end structure) and Mediterranean smooth planking (a front structure and juxtaposed planks).
The Douro River represents the cultural frontier that separated the two aforementioned styles, with Nordic-style boats prevailing in north-western rivers. To the south, and along the coast, Mediterranean-style boats dominated.
In addition to this cultural duality, barges and other boats boasting markedly Mediterranean features were commonly found in the Algarve, particularly in the coastal areas closest to neighbouring Andalusia, of which the most representative examples are the Calão and the Xávega. The latter has not been included in this stamp issue, as it is already featured in the “Portucale 77- Barcos da Costa Portuguesa” (Portucale 77 – Portuguese Coastal Boats) issue, launched in 1977. Both these boats bear traces from ancient Phoenician and Greek vessels, mostly evident in their bow decorations. Both boats feature a raised piece on the bow, horn- shaped in the Calão and in the shape of an elongated, stylised swan neck in the Xávega. Both boats feature barge-like hulls, without transoms. The Calão was propelled by oars or sails, whereas the Xávega was only propelled by oars. Although both were trawlers, the Calão also assisted larger ships engaged in deep sea fishing, namely tuna fishing, and transported fish to the shore.
The Canoa do Alto or Caçadeira, the Canoa da Picada and the Caíque were seagoing boats. The optimal performance afforded by their hulls inspired the building of recreational boats, widely used in regattas from the 19th century onwards, particularly by the Portuguese Royal House.
The Canoa da Picada carried salted sardines to the port of Lisbon; its leisure version, rigged differently, was known as coquette.
The Caíque, a fishing boat also used in port-to-port shipping, sailed on Moroccan waters and the Western Mediterranean. The “Bom Sucesso” (Good Fortune), a boat from Olhão, crossed the South Atlantic to take the news of the expulsion of Napoleon’s armies from Portugal to the Royal Family, exiled in Brazil.
The Galleon was introduced to the Algarve from Andalusia, to sail the high seas. This boat was soon replaced with a steam version and since then reconverted, to be used in the transport of salt. Its excellent performance on the high seas led a few sailing enthusiasts, namely from the Netherlands, to buy these boats and turn them into sports and pleasure craft.
The five boats depicted in this stamp issue portray Mediterranean traditions, not only regarding shipbuilding techniques but also in what concerns their origins.
Portugal Post web-site.

“galeão”: One of a team of boats working out of the Tagus Estuary, employing the large ring net. The rest of the team includes the motorized mother ship also called galeão, several buques and 1 – 2 small boats to serve the mother ship. The sailing galeão transport the net and aids in setting and hauling it.
Carvel-planked; sharp ends; curved stem with shredded wool on the stemhead to reduce chaffing of the sail; curved sternpost; keel.
Decked, 5 hatches. Outboard rudder with tiller. Mainly rowed; 7 rowing benches along each side; 2 men on each of the 6 oars forward of the mast, and 2 on the 8 oars abaft the mast. Oars held to tholepins by strops.
Quadrilateral lateen type sail with a short luff used when going to and from the fishing grounds. Forward raking mast secured by single shrouds.
Crew of 40 man and 4 boys.
Length 15.7m, beam 4m, depth 1.0m, 13.65 rt.

Portugal 2015 MS 1.80 Euro sg?, scott? (in margin of sheet on right side of stamp.)
Source: Aak to Zumbra, a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.


“canoa do alto”: Engaged in offshore fishing in the area from the Tagus River to the south coast.
Straight stem, curved forefoot; shredded wool on stemhead reduces sail chafing; wide raked wine-glass transom. Drag to the straight keel; bilge keels; high sides, strong sheer; 2 wales. Some full decked; more often only a foredeck; enclosed bench aft. Outboard rudder with tiller. Set a lateen sail or quadrilateral lateen-type sail with a short luff. Forward raking mast stepped on keelson. Some also employed a sprit-rigged, aft raking mizzenmast sheeted to an outrigger (as seen on stamp)
Rowed in calms and when shooting the net. Crew 11-13 plus 1-2 boys.
Reported lengths 6.58 – 8.5m; e.g. length 7.7m, beam 3m, depth 1.0m.

Portugal 2015 0.45 Euro sg?, scott? MS 1.80 Euro sg?, scott? (in margin of sheet.)
Source: Aak to Zumbra, a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.


“canoa da picada”; Developed by Portugal in the late 19th century as a fast seaworthy vessel to carry the catch from fishing boats to the Lisbon market. Also fished and in modified form has been a pleasure craft; reported also as a cargo carrier from south coast ports. Typical features include a long rounded counter stern above a sharply raked sternpost, maximum beam abaft amidships, and a gaff mizzen stepped on the counter and sheeted to an outrigger. Plump stem, deep drag to the keel, round bottom with slack bilges. Shredded wool on the stemhead prevents chafing of the sail.
Decked. 3 hatchways. Inboard rudder; tiller. May tow a small tender called an “aiola’. Sets a large quadrilateral lateen type sail with a short luff as a mainsail to a forward-raking or vertical mast; yard, carried generally to starboard, extends beyond the bow; tack to steamhead. Might also set a foresail and a mizzen staysail. Rowed in calms, oars stropped to tholepins.
Crew of 15 – 18 when serving as a market boat.
Reported lengths 13.7 – 18m. e.g. length 18m, beam 5.5m, depth 1.5m.

Portugal 2015 0.80 Euro. Sg?, scott?
Source Aak to Zumbra, a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft.


“calão”; A fishing boat used on the coast of the Algarve and also used to transport the fish too markets. Length between 7.5 – 12m.
Not much sheer, with a round bow which was open, oval stern and an outside rudder with tiller.
At least three rowing benches for the 6 rowers, three on each side.
One mast which carried a triangle sail.
Characterized by a painted eye (oculi) on the bow.
Crew 10 – 12 men.

Portugal 2015 0.72 Euro, sg?, scott?
Source: Internet.


The left top stamp shows Étienne Brûlé with a canoe.
The explorers of New France introduced Europeans to the Canadians Indians, outlined the geography of Central Canada and found the way west. Born in France about 1592, Étienne Brûlé (c1592 – 1633) arrived at Quebec in 1608. In 1610 Samuel de Champlain sent him to live with the Huron and to learn their language. The adventurous Brûlé was more than an interpreter, though. He became the first European to shoot the Lachine rapids and to set eyes on Lakes Huron, Ontario, Superior and Erie. Artist Frederick Hagan of Newmarket, Ontario, created the images for these stamps. The paintings project the power of strong colour to evoke the moods of changing seasons and landscape. Forest, lake, river and hilltops combine with elements of cartography and the heraldry of flags to suggest the activities and experiences of the early explorers of Central Canada. J.F. Britton of Oakville, Ontario, prepared the typography for the stamp designs. Most probably the canoe used as seen on the stamp was a “north canoe” also named “canot de maitre”.

The top right stamps shows Radisson and Des Groseilliers with in the middle of the stamp a voyage canoe.

In the 1640's, Radisson and Des Groseilliers arrived in New France. Both were seasoned coureurs de bois when in August 1659 they set out together for the "pays d'en haut" (hinterland). Geographic information gained from their conversations with the Lake Superior Indians led to the creation of the Hudson's Bay Company. Artist Frederick Hagan of Newmarket, Ontario, created the images for these stamps.

The lower stamp left shows also a voyage canoe.

In 1672 the Governor of New France commissioned Joliet, fur trader, organist and former candidate for the priesthood, to lead an expedition to the Mississippi River. He and Father Marquette, a Jesuit fluent in six Indian languages, discovered the Mississippi in 1673 and determined that it flowed south, not west.

The lower right stamp depict not a watercraft.

The explorers of New France introduced Europeans to the Canadians Indians, outlined the geography of Central Canada and found the way west. Champlain wanted to convert the Indians to Christianity, so in 1615 he brought Recollet missionaries to New France. Jesuits and Sulpicians, followed later. These were the best educated and most idealistic explorers yet to reach Canada. Their detailed reports were a goldmine of information for both contemporaries and historians.

Canada 1987 34c sg1232/35, scott?

Canadian Post press release 1987.


The full index of our ship stamp archive


Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Dec 22, 2009 8:16 pm

Click image to view full size
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Built under yard no 438 as a crude tanker (VLCC) by National Steel & Shipbuilding Co (NASSCO), San Diego for the Exxon Shipping Co., Philadelphia.
29 July 1985 keel laid down.
June 1986 launched under the name EXXON VALDEZ.
Tonnage 110,831 gross, 71,330 net, 214,861 dwt., dim. 300.8 x 50.6 x 38.2m., draught 26.8m.
One Sulzer Oil 2SA, 8-cyl engine, 31,650 bhp, speed 16.25 knots, crew 21.
10 December 1986 completed.

Built for the transport of crude oil from Valdez to Panama for subsequent transportation to Gulf and east Coast ports in the USA, as well as crude to West Coast USA ports.

On 23 March 1989, the supertanker EXXON VALDEZ pulled out of Valdez, Alaska, loaded with more than 56 million gallons of crude oil.
Captain Joseph Hazelwood, the master of the vessel had spent the day drinking with crew members.
Bartenders testified that he had consumed at least eight vodka doubles, and Coast Guard tests showed his blood alcohol level stood at 241- more than six times the permissible level under Coast Guard regulations.
Third mate Gregory Cousins was on duty beyond the limits specified by federal fatigue laws.
Hazelwood, Cousins and the rest of the crew faced a night voyage through ice in the Prince William Sound.

Hazelwood intoxication was evident from the alcohol on his breath, his speech (captured on audiotape) and, most of all, his actions as his ship navigated the Sound. While passing through fishing grounds, Hazelwood took the EXXON VALDEZ outside established shipping lanes to avoid ice. He put the vessel on automatic pilot accelerating directly at Bligh Reef.
Hazelwood then left the bridge in violation of federal pilotage regulations. As he went below, he gave vague instructions to the inexperienced and fatigued Cousins.
At four minutes past midnight on 24 March 1989 the supertanker struck Bligh Reef, (about 25 mile from Valdez) spilling 11 million gallons of oil, “the largest oil spill and greatest environmental disaster in American history,” claimed news report.
The grounding punctured eight of the eleven cargo tanks, and within four hours 5.8 million gallons had been lost.
By the time the tanker was refloated on 5 April 260.000 barrels had been lost and 2.600 square miles of the country’s greatest fishing grounds and the surrounding virgin shoreline were sheated in oil.

After the spill and the removal of the oil from the tanker the EXXON VALDEZ sailed to San Diego, under command of a new captain, for repairs by NASSCO.

Captain Hazelwood, who had a record of drunk driving arrests, was charged with criminal mischief, driving a watercraft while intoxicated, reckless endangerment, and negligent discharge of oil.
He was found guilty of the last count and fined $ 51.000 and sentenced to 1.000 hours of community service in lieu of six months in prison.

In 1990 the American Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, which barred the EXXON VALDEZ and 17 other vessels from Alaskan waters. A provision banning entry by any ship that had spilled more than 1 million gallons after 22 March 1989 was tacked onto the Act.
As a result, Exxon sent the renamed vessel EXXON MEDITERRANEAN, after repair, to carry oil from the Middle East to Europe and the Far East ports.

In 1990, Exxon Shipping Co., President Gus Elmer said “Due to declining Alaskan crude oil, the vessel will enter foreign service, most likely loading crude oil in the Mediterranean or the Middle East. It is consistent with our policy that the vessel be named according to their location.

Exxon officials declined to retrofit the ship with a double hull because it was not feasible from an engineering standpoint, an Exxon spokeswoman said in March 1990.
However a National Steel spokesman said, “It’s feasible to put a double hull. The question is the cost and the time.”

In the mid 1990’s Sea River Maritime (Exxon’s shipping subsidiary) filed a lawsuits to allow the former EXXON VALDEZ to return to Alaskan waters. They stated that the vessel was not financially viable trading in foreign waters.
In 1998, a judge upheld the ban. In a recent Appeal Court case in October 2002 the ban was again upheld.
It has been reported that in 1993 she was renamed in S/R MEDITERRANEAN and that she was mothballed (laid up) and anchored off a foreign port that the owners will not name.
From being repaired in 1990 until its lay-up, the vessel made 190 voyages around the world.
April 2005 renamed in MEDITERRANEAN, owned by Seariver International Inc., Marshall Islands flag and registry.
February 2008 sold to Hong Kong Bloom Shipping Ltd., renamed DONG FANG OCEAN, she was refitted in a ore carrier, managed by Cosco Shanghai Ship Management, Shanghai.
2008 Registered at Panama.
April 2012 sold to Best Oasis Ltd. Mumbai, India, renamed ORIENTAL NICETY, under Sierra Leone flag. She was sold for scrapping.
The same month renamed by owners in ORIENTAL N., Sierra Leone registry. (source )

Exxon Valdez denied the right to die in India

09 May 2012 Lloyds List
BULK carrier Oriental Nicety is refusing to bow out of shipping quietly, after the Indian authorities denied it entry to Alang for recycling following a row that only adds to the vessel’s notoriety.
The bulker that was formerly the very large crude carrier Exxon Valdez caused one the worst oil spills in history in Alaska in 1989. Renamed Oriental Nicety, it was scheduled to arrive in Alang today, according to broker reports.
However, vessel-tracking data from Lloyd’s List Intelligence shows that the vessel is at anchor near Malaysia.
According to international media reports, the authorities denied the ship entry until India’s Supreme Court rules on a petition by the Research Foundation for Science urging the authorities to turn the vessel away, alleging that it contains toxic waste.
The court is expected to hear the case on August 13.
Converted into an ore carrier in 2007, the 1986-built vessel, now operated by Coshipman, was reported sold on an as-is basis in Singapore for $460 per ldt, or $15.8m, at the end of March.
If the vessel cannot make it to India, it is likely to turn to China or to end its days on the beaches of Bangladesh.

IMO No. 8414520

Marshall Islands 1998 60c sg?, scott?
Sao Thome et Principe 2010 15000 DBMS sg?, scott?, (the other ship is the ATLANTIC EMPRESS on 35000 Db.)

Source: Watercraft Philately Vol. 49/50 P.Crichton. Ships of the World by Lincoln P.Paine. Marine News.
Some web-sites.
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