SANTANDER SAILING WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS 2014

A stamp in the Sports series is being issued, dedicated to the Santander ISAF Sailing World Championships 2014.
The Sailing World Championships is the most important event organized by the International Sailing Federation. It takes place every four years, two before the Olympic Games, and is used to allot 75% of the places for countries taking part in the Games.
Santander is hosting the 4th World Sailing Championships over the first two weeks of September, when it will welcome about 1000 yachts and 1400 crew from more than 95 countries. The eleven Olympic categories will take part in the competition. Countries which qualify can participate in the Rio de Janeiro Olympic Games in 2016.
The Royal Spanish Sailing Federation (RFEV) has set up several sites in the capital city of Cantabria, such as the marshland of the Santander Real Club Marítimo to moor the organization’s and keeled boats, the Star and the Elliots of the Women's Match Race, and the CEAR Príncipe Felipe (Specialist Centre for High Performance in Sailing), as well as other port areas nearby.
The first World Sailing Championships were held in Spain in 2003 in the Bay of Cadiz. Spanish philately marked this competition by issuing a commemorative stamp.
The second Championships were held in Cascais in Portugal in 2007, where 1350 sailors from 76 countries attended.
The third took place in Perth in Australia in 2011, with 1200 sailors from 79 countries.
Spain currently holds fourth place in the medals table in the World Sailing Championships, following the 2011 event, with three gold’s, one silver and two bronze.
The stamp recreates the blue waves of Cantabria, around yachts with sails billowing in the wind in front of the Magdalena Palace, an iconic building in Santander.
Spain 2014 Euro

Source: Spanish Post.

HAUNTED CANADA sailing vessel

Friday the 13th June 2014 Canada Post has issued five stamps that are sure to get the hairs raising on the back of your neck. The collection is the first in a multi-year series telling some of Canada’s most inexplicable and popular ghostly tales.
In every region across Canada, there are reports of apparitions, eerie sounds, phantom lights and spirits trapped between this world and the next.

Only one of this stamps which shows us a burning sailing vessel is interesting for the ship on stamp collectors.

The Northumberland Strait: The tale has been told by residents for at least 200 years of a vision of a burning ship on the waters between New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. On several occasions, onlookers have tried to rescue the ship but as soon as rescuers come close, the ship disappears into the mist.

Canada 2014 sg?, scott?

Source: Canada Post.
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VULTURE

By the stamp is given by Jersey post: Captain Peter Duval was a wanted man in the port of Bayonne, France. Around the year 1800, he commanded a small lugger named the VULTURE and engaged in harassing a large French brig of 180 tons with hidden firepower of 16 guns. As the Captain drew up alongside the French opened fire but missed the smaller vessel which successfully scored cannon hits direct on to the brig’s hull.
Downloaded from the internet:
VULTURE was one of the most successful privateers in the Napoleonic Wars, which started badly for Jersey. Commanded by Capt Peter Duval, she brought in 16 prizes from the Bay of Biscay between 1795 and 1798.
Capt Duval was wanted man in the port of Bayonne, whose merchants had sufferred badly from his success. They set a trap, disguising a brig of 180 tons with hidden firepower of 16 guns. Duval could not resist so seemingly easy a target and pulled alongside demanding their surrender. The French opened fire and missed.
What they had not taken account was the difference in height between the two ships. The VULTURE was a small lugger of 100 tons, four guns and 27 men, the brig's guns fired over her head but the VULTURE’s cannon all scored direct hits on the French ship's hull. They were forced to withdraw, having only managed to inflict slight damage on the VULTURE’s rigging.
Snipe
VULTURE was still successful in 1812 when, commanded by Captain Francis Le Feuvre and accompanied by another privateer, EARL ST VINCENT, she captured an American vessel, the SNIPE, which was attempting to run a blockade off the French coast at Bordeaux.
The SNIPE’s cargo was sold at public auction at L'Hotel de Deal in St Helier on 7 October. It consisted of:
• 212 cases of white sugar from Havanna
• 51 sacks of spices
• 10 barrels of Rocou
• 28 bales of cotton
• 151 sacks of cocoa
• 709 bales of coffee
• 248 half bales of Bourbon coffee
• 838 sacks of Java coffee
• 389 sacks of coffee
• 10 barrels of coffee
• 205 sacks of pepper
• 24 sacks of indigo
• 146 bear skins
After the sale the 216-tonne ship itself was auctioned. The new owners renamed it the MARS and it also became a privateer. Under Captain Noe Le Sueur she captured the SPEEDWELL, whose American crew were disgusted to discover they had been taken by a ship that not long before had been one of their own.

Jersey 2014 46p sg?, scott?
http://www.theislandwiki.org/index.php/The_''Vulture''

Rhein (Barque) 1849

Rhein was built by von Somm at Hamburg Germany and delivered to Hapag (a company in Germany, Hamburg Amerikanische Paketfahtr Aktien Gesellschaft) on 09 March 1849.

She was Hamburg America Liner. She was one of the four ships with which Hapag started business in 1848. Her displacement is 360 gross tons, lenght 131,7', breadth 29', depth 17,4'. As built, she carried 220 passengers in two classes, crew; 16. In 1851, her passenger capacity increased to 240.

She made 22 voyages between Hamburg-New York-Hamburg and was sold on 25 March 1858 to Bernhardt Wencke, Hamburg, for trading to the Far East. In 1864 she was sold again in Singapore.

The stamp design is from a painting by her Commander, Capt. P. Popp. On the stamp she is flying the flag of the state of Hamburg. She capsized during her launch on 22 November 1848, was salvaged immediatelly, and delivered to Hapag 09 March 1849. She sailed on her Maiden Voyage from Hamburg to New York on 24 March 1849.

Paraguay 1977, S.G;?, Scott; 1764d.

Source: H.G.Hermann; Kludas, Die Schiffe der Hamburg-Amerika Linie, 1847-1906, Vol-I

Source: A. Kresse, Seechiffs-Verzeichnis der Hamburger Reedereien, 1824-1888, Vol-I

JERSEY PRIVATEERS and PIRATES

In the days when the easiest method of transportation goods in bulk was by water, unscrupulous members of seafaring communities saw its disruption as an ideal way of making money. Piracy was frowned on by authorities unless the ship happened to belong to an enemy power in which case a blind eye may have been turned. Despite this, piracy was a criminal offence unless it was sanctioned by the state and termed ‘privateering’.
In 1689, the practice of issuing ‘Letters of Marques’ became common, effectively a licence to thieve on the high seas and commissions were issued to vessels authorising their owners to attack and plunder the King’s enemies during war time. Any prize was sold and the profit was divided amongst the State, the ship owners and the crew.
Previously, the English Civil war period saw a blossoming of privateering activity in Jersey under Sir George Carteret who started with just one galley, built up his fleet of privateers to about a dozen by arming his prizes. Of course it was not only Jersey which issued Letters of Marques and by 1652, the Channel had been infested by freelance privateers, flying the flags of all nations and bringing the islands to a stranglehold.
Once legalised, Jersey ship owners were quick to take advantage of the situation with the numbers of vessels and captured prizes rising steadily during the French wars. The heyday of the Jersey privateering, however was the 18th century. In the first two years of the French War 1793-1802, 42 local boats and 900 Jerseymen were captured by the French, representing two thirds of the island’s shipping and 4% of the population. With the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815, peace came to Europe and privateering fell into disuse until it was finally abolished in 1856 bringing with it the end of an era which had brought prosperity to the island.
Jersey 2014 46p/£1.20 and Souvenir Sheetlet £2.91 sg?. Scott?
Source: Jersey Stamp Bulletin Autumn 2014.

46p Shows the lugger VULTURE on the right and a French ship.
69p Shows CUMBERLAND in the background of the stamp.
56p Shows the CHARMING BETTY capturing the French bark ST CHARLES.
£1.20 Shows the CHARMING NANCY capturing the French Le HERON.

MERCATOR. Gerardus 1512-1594

Gerardus Mercator  is best known for his work in cartography, in particular theworld map of 1569 based on a new projection which represented sailing courses of constant bearing as straight lines. He was the first to use the term " atlas " for a collection of maps.Before Mercator's time, world maps were basically useless to navigators plotting voyages of discovery and trade. The maps may have shown landmasses correctly, but generally they did not show proportional distance and direction so navigators could not plot a compass course. In his map, Mercator drew straight, equidistant longitude lines, perpendicular to latitude lines, forming a grid which could be used to accurately determine sea routes. Mercator created and published numerous other maps, many of which were posthumously published by his son as Atlas' or Cosmographic Meditations on the Structure of the World . This marked the first use of the world atlas in connection with a book of maps. Mercator also introduced the use of italics to the text of maps.                                                                                                                                                                      Mercator was born Gerhard Kremer on March 5, 1512, in Rupelmonde, Flanders, and changed his name when he became a student at the University of Louvain in1530. Though Mercator studied philosophy and theology, he also developed an interest in astronomy, mathematics, geography, art and engraving. He studied the first two subjects under Gemmy Phrysius, a cartographer and mathematician.While Mercator lived in Louvain, from 1530 until 1552, Mercator made scientific instruments and worked as a surveyor, while makings his first maps and globes. His earliest globe was finished about 1536, and he published his first map in 1537. Its subject was Palestine. In 1844, Mercator was imprisoned for several months in Louvain for heresy, though he was set free due to lack of evidence. In 1552, Mercator moved to Duisberg in what is now Germany, where he was employed by the Duke of Cleves. Mercator did his most significant work under Cleves's patronage in Duisberg.  In 1569, Mercator designed his Great World Map to facilitate sea travel, inspired by his contact with sea captains and navigators. His grid based of equidistant meridians (longitude lines) and parallels (latitude lines) drawn perpendicularly is known as a graticule. Mercator's graticule allowed constant compass bearing to be plotted as a straight line. While Mercator's map was useful for navigators because it preserved constant compass directions, it had drawbacks. Landmasses were not depicted in their true area and proportions, except at the equator. The further from the equator the landmass is, the bigger it looks on Mercator's map. Hence, Greenland looks much larger than the continent of South America, though it is really half its size. The North and South Poles cannot be projected at all. But the relationships between these landmasses are correctly depicted. Mercator's innovation did not become widespread until 1599, when Edward Wright published corrective tables for navigator's use.                                                                                                                                                                                                   Mercator also designed, engraved, and published many maps of Europe and its different parts. In 1554, for example, he published an accurate, detailed map of Europe. Eventually, 107 of these maps appeared in the atlas published by his son in 1595. Mercator also built globes on commission, including a one made of crystal and wood for the Holy Roman Emperor, Charles V. Mercator died in Duisberg on December 2, 1594.

Guinea 2012; 40000fg,5000fg,15000fg,20000fg;SG?
Belgium 2012;3f;SG?
Source:

http://www.madehow.com/inventorbios/54/ ... cator.html

By Anatoly

T-91 (Patrol Boat) 1970

This coastal patrol craft is one of three patrol boats built by Royal Thai Naval Dockyard, Bangkok. Commissioned in 1971.

Displacement; 87,5 tons standart, 104,3' x 17,5'. Draft; 5,5', 2 diesels, 1600 bhp, two screws, speed; 25 knots, Armament; 1 x 40 mm and 1 x 20 mm guns. Range; 700 miles at 21 knots, complement; 21.

Thailand 1979, S.G.?, Scott; 898.

Source: Janes Figthing Ships
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EXXON VALDEZ tanker

The full index of our ship stamp archive

EXXON VALDEZ tanker

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Dec 22, 2009 8:16 pm

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Built under yard no 438 as a crude tanker (VLCC) by National Steel & Shipbuilding Co (NASSCO), San Diego for the Exxon Shipping Co., Philadelphia.
29 July 1985 keel laid down.
June 1986 launched under the name EXXON VALDEZ.
Tonnage 110,831 gross, 71,330 net, 214,861 dwt., dim. 300.8 x 50.6 x 38.2m., draught 26.8m.
One Sulzer Oil 2SA, 8-cyl engine, 31,650 bhp, speed 16.25 knots, crew 21.
10 December 1986 completed.

Built for the transport of crude oil from Valdez to Panama for subsequent transportation to Gulf and east Coast ports in the USA, as well as crude to West Coast USA ports.

On 23 March 1989, the supertanker EXXON VALDEZ pulled out of Valdez, Alaska, loaded with more than 56 million gallons of crude oil.
Captain Joseph Hazelwood, the master of the vessel had spent the day drinking with crew members.
Bartenders testified that he had consumed at least eight vodka doubles, and Coast Guard tests showed his blood alcohol level stood at 241- more than six times the permissible level under Coast Guard regulations.
Third mate Gregory Cousins was on duty beyond the limits specified by federal fatigue laws.
Hazelwood, Cousins and the rest of the crew faced a night voyage through ice in the Prince William Sound.

Hazelwood intoxication was evident from the alcohol on his breath, his speech (captured on audiotape) and, most of all, his actions as his ship navigated the Sound. While passing through fishing grounds, Hazelwood took the EXXON VALDEZ outside established shipping lanes to avoid ice. He put the vessel on automatic pilot accelerating directly at Bligh Reef.
Hazelwood then left the bridge in violation of federal pilotage regulations. As he went below, he gave vague instructions to the inexperienced and fatigued Cousins.
At four minutes past midnight on 24 March 1989 the supertanker struck Bligh Reef, (about 25 mile from Valdez) spilling 11 million gallons of oil, “the largest oil spill and greatest environmental disaster in American history,” claimed news report.
The grounding punctured eight of the eleven cargo tanks, and within four hours 5.8 million gallons had been lost.
By the time the tanker was refloated on 5 April 260.000 barrels had been lost and 2.600 square miles of the country’s greatest fishing grounds and the surrounding virgin shoreline were sheated in oil.

After the spill and the removal of the oil from the tanker the EXXON VALDEZ sailed to San Diego, under command of a new captain, for repairs by NASSCO.

Captain Hazelwood, who had a record of drunk driving arrests, was charged with criminal mischief, driving a watercraft while intoxicated, reckless endangerment, and negligent discharge of oil.
He was found guilty of the last count and fined $ 51.000 and sentenced to 1.000 hours of community service in lieu of six months in prison.

In 1990 the American Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, which barred the EXXON VALDEZ and 17 other vessels from Alaskan waters. A provision banning entry by any ship that had spilled more than 1 million gallons after 22 March 1989 was tacked onto the Act.
As a result, Exxon sent the renamed vessel EXXON MEDITERRANEAN, after repair, to carry oil from the Middle East to Europe and the Far East ports.

In 1990, Exxon Shipping Co., President Gus Elmer said “Due to declining Alaskan crude oil, the vessel will enter foreign service, most likely loading crude oil in the Mediterranean or the Middle East. It is consistent with our policy that the vessel be named according to their location.

Exxon officials declined to retrofit the ship with a double hull because it was not feasible from an engineering standpoint, an Exxon spokeswoman said in March 1990.
However a National Steel spokesman said, “It’s feasible to put a double hull. The question is the cost and the time.”

In the mid 1990’s Sea River Maritime (Exxon’s shipping subsidiary) filed a lawsuits to allow the former EXXON VALDEZ to return to Alaskan waters. They stated that the vessel was not financially viable trading in foreign waters.
In 1998, a judge upheld the ban. In a recent Appeal Court case in October 2002 the ban was again upheld.
It has been reported that in 1993 she was renamed in S/R MEDITERRANEAN and that she was mothballed (laid up) and anchored off a foreign port that the owners will not name.
From being repaired in 1990 until its lay-up, the vessel made 190 voyages around the world.
April 2005 renamed in MEDITERRANEAN, owned by Seariver International Inc., Marshall Islands flag and registry.
February 2008 sold to Hong Kong Bloom Shipping Ltd., renamed DONG FANG OCEAN, she was refitted in a ore carrier, managed by Cosco Shanghai Ship Management, Shanghai.
2008 Registered at Panama.
April 2012 sold to Best Oasis Ltd. Mumbai, India, renamed ORIENTAL NICETY, under Sierra Leone flag. She was sold for scrapping.
The same month renamed by owners in ORIENTAL N., Sierra Leone registry. (source http://www.equasis.org )

Exxon Valdez denied the right to die in India

09 May 2012 Lloyds List
BULK carrier Oriental Nicety is refusing to bow out of shipping quietly, after the Indian authorities denied it entry to Alang for recycling following a row that only adds to the vessel’s notoriety.
The bulker that was formerly the very large crude carrier Exxon Valdez caused one the worst oil spills in history in Alaska in 1989. Renamed Oriental Nicety, it was scheduled to arrive in Alang today, according to broker reports.
However, vessel-tracking data from Lloyd’s List Intelligence shows that the vessel is at anchor near Malaysia.
According to international media reports, the authorities denied the ship entry until India’s Supreme Court rules on a petition by the Research Foundation for Science urging the authorities to turn the vessel away, alleging that it contains toxic waste.
The court is expected to hear the case on August 13.
Converted into an ore carrier in 2007, the 1986-built vessel, now operated by Coshipman, was reported sold on an as-is basis in Singapore for $460 per ldt, or $15.8m, at the end of March.
If the vessel cannot make it to India, it is likely to turn to China or to end its days on the beaches of Bangladesh.


IMO No. 8414520

Marshall Islands 1998 60c sg?, scott?
Sao Thome et Principe 2010 15000 DBMS sg?, scott?, (the other ship is the ATLANTIC EMPRESS on 35000 Db.)

Source: Watercraft Philately Vol. 49/50 P.Crichton. Ships of the World by Lincoln P.Paine. Marine News.
Some web-sites.
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