SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

SHIP STAMP SOCIETY

Interested in Ships and Stamps? The Ship Stamp Society is an international society and publishes it’s journal, Log Book, six time a year.
Other benefits include the availability of a "Packet" for anyone who wants to purchase or sell ship stamps.
Full membership of £17 (UK only) includes receiving Log Book by post, but there is an online membership costing just £12pa.
Full details can be found on our web site at http://www.shipstampsociety.com where you can also join and pay your chosen subscription through Paypal or by cheque.
A free sample of Log Book is available on request.

BRIDAL BOAT IN HARDANGER FJORD

On this stamp issued by Norway in 1974 you see a bridal boat carrying the bride and groom and her guests dressed in traditional garb on her wedding day to or from the church some-where in the Hardanger fjord, Norway.
The painting was made in 1848 by the Norwegian landscape painter Hans Gude in collaboration with Adolph Tidemand, the painting has the title “The Bridal Procession in Hardanger” and it is a famous well know painting in Norway. When you click on this link you can see a very large image of the painting, when you enlarge the painting, the bride is sitting in the stern.
http://samling.nasjonalmuseet.no/en/object/NG.M.00467

Of the boat used I have not much information, most probably the “kirkebåt” was used, which was owned by the farmers of the district, and it was important that the boat carrying the bride should be the fastest, and stout oarsmen had to be selected among the young men of the community.

Norway 1974 1k sg 716, scott 633
Source: Internet

DAO

The three stamps issued by the Comoro Islands in 1970 shows us on the foreground three ships under sail, which Stanley Gibbons give that it are “feluccas” actual it are “dau’s” also known as “boutre” but she are a larger type.

You can find this type of vessels in the Comoro Islands and western Indian Ocean. The “dau” is a roughly constructed wooden vessel that carried cargo to the west coast of India, taken advantage of the monsoon winds. Slightly raking stem, square stern. Decked or open.
Set a large lateen to forward-raking mast; yard supported by a jibboom.
Reported lengths 13.7 – 15.2m, beamy; tonnage 50 to 60 ton.
The mosque is the Mosquée de Vendredi (old Friday mosque), which is the oldest mosque in the Medina. It was originally built in 1427, and a minaret was added in 1921.

Comoro Islands 1970 5/40f sg 91/93, scott
Source: From Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft. Internet.

AMERICA CUP yacht 1970

The stamp issued by Mali in March 1971 shows us an unnamed America cup yacht, most probably for the 1970 America Cup races in Newport, Rhode Island which was won by the America yacht INTREPID, at that time the yachts used in the race were of the 12m class. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12-metre_class

The 1970 America's Cup was held in September 1970 at Newport, Rhode Island. The US defender, INTREPID, skippered by Bill (Ficker is Quicker) Ficker, defeated the Australian challenger, GRETEL II, skippered by James Hardy, four races to one
INTREPID had beaten HERITAGE and VALIANT to become the defender. (1962 winner WEATHERLY also participated in the trials, providing a fourth boat so racing could proceed more uniformly.) GRETEL II had beaten FRANCE to become the challenger

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1970_America%27s_Cup
Mali 1971 200f sg 271, scott?

Navicula gives that the FRANCE is depict, but I can’t find any confirmation for that.
http://www.12mrclass.com/yachts/detail/ ... 07113.html

VAKA HEKE FA outrigger Niue

The dugout outrigger canoes used in Niue were built with the same structure of the Tonga Islands and are single outrigger canoes and used for fishing, the modern canoes are small fishing craft holding from one to four men.
The outrigger is always on the left side of the hull of the canoe which are connected with two or more booms lashed to the topstrakes of the canoe, and the booms are lashed to the outrigger float.
Mostly decked fore and aft.

From Aak to Zumbra named this outrigger a “vaka heke fa” and gives the following information:
Used in the Niue Islands and central Pacific; a four men fishing canoe. Dugout hull, washstrakes and end decking sewn on; slender; elongated ends taper on all sides, rounded bottom. Hull spread with curved pieces lashed to three booms, which also serve as thwarts; stringers cross atop the booms above the washstrakes. Sharp ended, cylindrical float attached by two pairs of oblique stanchions and a single vertical one.
She are paddled by using lanceolate-bladed paddles.
The canoe has to be light in weight due to the waters around the island are deep and the canoe has to be carried out of the water on shore after use.
Length 7.6m, beam 0.4m depth 0.46 – 0.6m.

Source: Aak to Zumbra a dictionary of the World’s Watercraft and internet.
Niue 1950 2d sg 115, scott96, 1970 3c sg 155, scott?, 1999 20c sg?, scott 741a.

TAINO KANOA

The Tainos people mean of transportation was the dugout “kanoa” (canoe) to travel up and down the rivers also the coastal waters and oceans. They had large and small canoes which were made mostly from wood of the silk cotton tree, which can grow to a length of 25 m. or more.
To hollow out the tree fire was used to soften the inside and when after cooled down stone and shell tools were used to dig-out the inside.
The dugout canoe of the Tainos was long and narrow, flattened bottom, no keel, hull tarred.
Also small single person canoes were used, Columbus reported that he had seen Tainos canoes with 80 paddlers.

Cuba 1985 5c sg 3085, scott 2775 and 50c sg3088, scott 2778.
Aak to Zumbra a Dictionary of the World’s Watercraft and internet.

TAINOS fishing

The Tainos were excellent and very skillful fishermen. They knew very well the rivers, lagoons, mangroves and seas. They used hooks made of fish thorns, tortoise shells and bone. They fished with reeds in their canoes and with cabuya (thin lines) from the shore, they also fished with spears in the rivers and on beaches. They used nets, when the first Spaniards arrived in Cuba they discovered the Tainos had excellent mesh nets and ingenious traps. They knew how to fish using pens that were fences formed from sticks joined with vines, stick to the bottom of rivers and other suitable places in which they caught fish, shellfish turtles. Incredibly they used a fish hook known as Guaicano (remore- or suckerfish) that sticks to the larger fish, and fastened from a cabuya. They used small torches to catch crab. They fished by spewing poisonous substances into the water. In the waters they threw leaves of Barbasco with which they stun the fish that they then collected with ease. They collected shellfish, oysters, and carruchos. (some mollusc).
The Tainos food was natural and tasty of all the delights of the sea and the bodies of water that abounded in a paradisiacal island like Boriquén (Porto Rico)

Cuba 1985 5c sg3085, scott 2775.
http://mayra-losindiostainos.blogspot.co.nz/2009/ Internet.
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EXXON VALDEZ tanker

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EXXON VALDEZ tanker

Postby aukepalmhof » Tue Dec 22, 2009 8:16 pm

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Built under yard no 438 as a crude tanker (VLCC) by National Steel & Shipbuilding Co (NASSCO), San Diego for the Exxon Shipping Co., Philadelphia.
29 July 1985 keel laid down.
June 1986 launched under the name EXXON VALDEZ.
Tonnage 110,831 gross, 71,330 net, 214,861 dwt., dim. 300.8 x 50.6 x 38.2m., draught 26.8m.
One Sulzer Oil 2SA, 8-cyl engine, 31,650 bhp, speed 16.25 knots, crew 21.
10 December 1986 completed.

Built for the transport of crude oil from Valdez to Panama for subsequent transportation to Gulf and east Coast ports in the USA, as well as crude to West Coast USA ports.

On 23 March 1989, the supertanker EXXON VALDEZ pulled out of Valdez, Alaska, loaded with more than 56 million gallons of crude oil.
Captain Joseph Hazelwood, the master of the vessel had spent the day drinking with crew members.
Bartenders testified that he had consumed at least eight vodka doubles, and Coast Guard tests showed his blood alcohol level stood at 241- more than six times the permissible level under Coast Guard regulations.
Third mate Gregory Cousins was on duty beyond the limits specified by federal fatigue laws.
Hazelwood, Cousins and the rest of the crew faced a night voyage through ice in the Prince William Sound.

Hazelwood intoxication was evident from the alcohol on his breath, his speech (captured on audiotape) and, most of all, his actions as his ship navigated the Sound. While passing through fishing grounds, Hazelwood took the EXXON VALDEZ outside established shipping lanes to avoid ice. He put the vessel on automatic pilot accelerating directly at Bligh Reef.
Hazelwood then left the bridge in violation of federal pilotage regulations. As he went below, he gave vague instructions to the inexperienced and fatigued Cousins.
At four minutes past midnight on 24 March 1989 the supertanker struck Bligh Reef, (about 25 mile from Valdez) spilling 11 million gallons of oil, “the largest oil spill and greatest environmental disaster in American history,” claimed news report.
The grounding punctured eight of the eleven cargo tanks, and within four hours 5.8 million gallons had been lost.
By the time the tanker was refloated on 5 April 260.000 barrels had been lost and 2.600 square miles of the country’s greatest fishing grounds and the surrounding virgin shoreline were sheated in oil.

After the spill and the removal of the oil from the tanker the EXXON VALDEZ sailed to San Diego, under command of a new captain, for repairs by NASSCO.

Captain Hazelwood, who had a record of drunk driving arrests, was charged with criminal mischief, driving a watercraft while intoxicated, reckless endangerment, and negligent discharge of oil.
He was found guilty of the last count and fined $ 51.000 and sentenced to 1.000 hours of community service in lieu of six months in prison.

In 1990 the American Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, which barred the EXXON VALDEZ and 17 other vessels from Alaskan waters. A provision banning entry by any ship that had spilled more than 1 million gallons after 22 March 1989 was tacked onto the Act.
As a result, Exxon sent the renamed vessel EXXON MEDITERRANEAN, after repair, to carry oil from the Middle East to Europe and the Far East ports.

In 1990, Exxon Shipping Co., President Gus Elmer said “Due to declining Alaskan crude oil, the vessel will enter foreign service, most likely loading crude oil in the Mediterranean or the Middle East. It is consistent with our policy that the vessel be named according to their location.

Exxon officials declined to retrofit the ship with a double hull because it was not feasible from an engineering standpoint, an Exxon spokeswoman said in March 1990.
However a National Steel spokesman said, “It’s feasible to put a double hull. The question is the cost and the time.”

In the mid 1990’s Sea River Maritime (Exxon’s shipping subsidiary) filed a lawsuits to allow the former EXXON VALDEZ to return to Alaskan waters. They stated that the vessel was not financially viable trading in foreign waters.
In 1998, a judge upheld the ban. In a recent Appeal Court case in October 2002 the ban was again upheld.
It has been reported that in 1993 she was renamed in S/R MEDITERRANEAN and that she was mothballed (laid up) and anchored off a foreign port that the owners will not name.
From being repaired in 1990 until its lay-up, the vessel made 190 voyages around the world.
April 2005 renamed in MEDITERRANEAN, owned by Seariver International Inc., Marshall Islands flag and registry.
February 2008 sold to Hong Kong Bloom Shipping Ltd., renamed DONG FANG OCEAN, she was refitted in a ore carrier, managed by Cosco Shanghai Ship Management, Shanghai.
2008 Registered at Panama.
April 2012 sold to Best Oasis Ltd. Mumbai, India, renamed ORIENTAL NICETY, under Sierra Leone flag. She was sold for scrapping.
The same month renamed by owners in ORIENTAL N., Sierra Leone registry. (source http://www.equasis.org )

Exxon Valdez denied the right to die in India

09 May 2012 Lloyds List
BULK carrier Oriental Nicety is refusing to bow out of shipping quietly, after the Indian authorities denied it entry to Alang for recycling following a row that only adds to the vessel’s notoriety.
The bulker that was formerly the very large crude carrier Exxon Valdez caused one the worst oil spills in history in Alaska in 1989. Renamed Oriental Nicety, it was scheduled to arrive in Alang today, according to broker reports.
However, vessel-tracking data from Lloyd’s List Intelligence shows that the vessel is at anchor near Malaysia.
According to international media reports, the authorities denied the ship entry until India’s Supreme Court rules on a petition by the Research Foundation for Science urging the authorities to turn the vessel away, alleging that it contains toxic waste.
The court is expected to hear the case on August 13.
Converted into an ore carrier in 2007, the 1986-built vessel, now operated by Coshipman, was reported sold on an as-is basis in Singapore for $460 per ldt, or $15.8m, at the end of March.
If the vessel cannot make it to India, it is likely to turn to China or to end its days on the beaches of Bangladesh.


IMO No. 8414520

Marshall Islands 1998 60c sg?, scott?
Sao Thome et Principe 2010 15000 DBMS sg?, scott?, (the other ship is the ATLANTIC EMPRESS on 35000 Db.)

Source: Watercraft Philately Vol. 49/50 P.Crichton. Ships of the World by Lincoln P.Paine. Marine News.
Some web-sites.
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